First Amendment topicsAbout the First Amendment
News Story
 
S.D. lawmakers scrap latest vanity-plate bill

By The Associated Press
01.30.08

PIERRE, S.D. — A state law that says personalized license plates in South Dakota must be in “good taste and decency” will not be changed by lawmakers.

A bill that would have set tougher guidelines for messages that are displayed on vanity plates was killed unanimously yesterday without discussion by the state Senate Transportation Committee.

S.B. 185 said license plate messages could not be vulgar, profane, derogatory, obscene or racially offensive.

Sen. Bill Napoli, R-Rapid City, said later that he had asked the committee to kill his bill because the state Motor Vehicles Division opposed it. The division had earlier endorsed a measure that would have eliminated personalized plates entirely, but the committee rejected that bill.

“I think they wanted all or nothing, so if they’re not interested in it, I’m not, either,” Napoli said of S.B. 185.

State officials had said on the earlier bill to eliminate vanity plates (S.B. 20) that it’s becoming very difficult to police the messages that people want to display on them. They said the state could face a lawsuit over free speech by those who were denied the use of certain slogans that can be displayed with letters and numbers.

State officials added that the state also faces the prospect of being sued by those who see vanity plates they believe are offensive.

Personalized license plates cost an extra $25 a year for cars and trucks and $20 extra for motorcycles. Those costs are in addition to regular licensing fees.

The special plates for cars and trucks may contain up to seven letters, but no fewer than two letters. Motorcycles are limited to six letters.


Previous
S.D. Senate puts brakes on effort to eliminate vanity plates
DMV chief argues that state is at risk for free-speech lawsuits from people who are denied personalized tags. 01.16.08

Related

Car talk: The hour may be late for the vanity PL8

By Gene Policinski Some states growing impatient with navigating pitfalls involving personalized license plates. 01.13.08

License plates

News summary page
View the latest news stories throughout the First Amendment Center Online.

print this   Print


Last system update: Friday, July 25, 2008 | 05:15:11
 SEARCH  MORE
About this site
About the First Amendment
About the First Amendment Center
Video/RSS/podcasts
First Amendment programs
State of the First Amendment
reports

First Reports
Supreme Court
Experts
Columnists
First Amendment publications
First Amendment Center history
Glossary
Freedom Sings™
Events
First Amendment
Schools

Congressional Research Service reports
Guest editorials
FOI material
The First Amendment
Library

Lesson plans
freedomforum.org
Newseum
Contact us
Privacy statement
Related links