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Justices deny Kucinich bid to get on Texas primary ballot

By The Associated Press
01.22.08

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court has allowed Texas to print presidential primary ballots without Democratic candidate Dennis Kucinich's name.

The Court refused on Jan. 18 to step into a dispute between Kucinich and the Texas Democratic Party over a loyalty oath all candidates must sign to make the ballot.

Kucinich and singer-supporter Willie Nelson objected to the party oath that a presidential candidate must "fully support" the party's eventual nominee. The Ohio congressman crossed out the oath when he filed for a spot on the primary ballot.

A federal judge in Austin ruled against Kucinich last week. U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel ruled the state party has the right to require the oath. Kucinich and Nelson argued it violated Kucinich's First Amendment right to free speech.

Texas had said its deadline was Jan. 19 to print absentee ballots so that they could reach overseas voters in time for the March 4 primary.

The Kucinich campaign said after the Jan. 18 ruling in Kucinich v. Texas Democratic Party that it would return to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans this week to argue its case that the candidate should be on the March 4 ballot.


Previous
Democrats can keep Kucinich off Texas ballot
Federal judge rejects argument that oath to 'fully support' eventual party nominee violates presidential candidate's First Amendment rights. 01.14.08

Related

Nev. high court: Kucinich can't force way into debate

Unanimous court said that blocking debate unless Kucinich got to participate would be 'unconstitutional prior restraint' on MSNBC's First Amendment rights. 01.15.08

Clinton backers roll snake eyes in fight against casino caucuses
Nevada Democrats 'have a First Amendment right to association, to assemble and to set their own rules,' federal judge says. 01.18.08

Court backs N.Y. judicial-election system despite concerns
By Tony Mauro While agreeing that method of selecting judges is constitutional, some justices criticize state's practice. 01.17.08

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