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News number: 8708081582

18:54 | 2008-10-29

Defence

نسخه چاپي ارسال به دوستان

Iran Warns Enemies of Severe Blow

TEHRAN (FNA)- Iranian defense officials Tuesday said the armed forces of the country were ready to deal with enemy threats, specifically in electronic warfare.



Iranian Defense Minister Mostafa Mohammad Najjar spoke of the technological developments of the nation's armed forces at a presentation at Malek Ashtar University of Technology in Isfahan.

He noted the military was in full combat readiness on all fronts, adding forces were ready to deal with any intimidation.

"We are ready to seriously deal with the enemies' threats in all areas, mainly in electronic warfare," he said.

Speaking of the global economy, Najjar said the world reaction to the crisis was a testament to the declining influence of Washington.

"We are witnessing that the world public opinion hates the United States," he said.

His comments follow earlier statements made by Mehdi Karroubi, an Iranian presidential candidate with the National Confidence Party, who said Tehran could repair relations with the United States if Washington "abandons its hegemonic objectives" in the region.

Other Iranian military officials also warned this week against a unilateral strike on the Islamic Republic in the wake of a US raid against Syria.

Deputy Army Commander Brigadier General Abdul-Rahim Mousavi told reporters on Tuesday that the time has come for the enemy to acknowledge Iran's defense capabilities.

"Recognition of Iran's naval mastery has traveled beyond the country's southern waters, and has reached the far ends of the Indian Ocean," said Brig. Gen. Mousavi.

The Iranian commander stressed that giant Western aircraft carriers and battleships do not intimidate world nations as they once did.

In a Tuesday statement, the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps' (IRGC) naval commander, Admiral Morteza Saffari said that Iran's navy has been reorganized and is ready to defend the nation against all threats.

"Iran's naval forces will make sure that the enemy will live to regret any act of aggression against the Islamic Republic," said Admiral Saffari.

Acting IRGC commander Mohammad Hejazi, meanwhile, vowed on Tuesday that Iran's armed forces would shield the nation from invaders and defend the Islamic Republic's national interest.

"IRGC forces have the determination and experience to guard Iran's national interests," said Brig. Gen. Hejazi.

"They (the enemy) should learn from the mistakes of the past and realize that Iran is unlike any other country in the Middle East," he added.

Israel and its close ally the United States accuse Iran of seeking a nuclear weapon, while they have never presented any corroborative document to substantiate their allegations. Both Washington and Tel Aviv possess advanced weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear warheads.

Iran vehemently denies the charges, insisting that its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes only. Tehran stresses that the country has always pursued a civilian path to provide power to the growing number of Iranian population, whose fossil fuel would eventually run dry.

Speculation that Israel could bomb Iran has mounted since a big Israeli air drill in June. In the first week of June, 100 Israeli F-16 and F-15 fighters reportedly took part in an exercise over the eastern Mediterranean and Greece, which was interpreted as a dress rehearsal for a possible attack on Iran's nuclear installations.

A US attack on the Syrian village of Sukkariyah on Monday, has also further reinvigorated speculations about the likelihood of a unilateral strike on the Islamic Republic.

Iran has, in return, warned that it would target Israel and its worldwide interests in case it comes under attack by the Tel Aviv.

The United States has also always stressed that military action is a main option for the White House to deter Iran's progress in the field of nuclear technology.

Iran has warned it could close the strategic Strait of Hormoz if it became the target of a military attack over its nuclear program.

Strait of Hormoz, the entrance to the strategic Persian Gulf waterway, is a major oil shipping route.

Intensified threats by Tel Aviv and Washington of military action against Iran contradict a recent report by 16 US intelligence bodies which endorsed the civilian nature of Iran's nuclear plans and activities.

Following the US National Intelligence Estimate (NIE) and similar reports by the IAEA head - one in November and the other one in February - which praised Iran's truthfulness about key aspects of its past nuclear activities and announced settlement of outstanding issues with Tehran, any effort to impose further sanctions or launch military attack on Iran seems to be completely irrational.

The February report by the UN nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, praised Iran's cooperation in clearing up all of the past questions over its nuclear program, vindicating Iran's nuclear program and leaving no justification for any new UN sanctions.

The UN nuclear watchdog has also carried out at least 14 surprise inspections of Iran's nuclear sites so far, but found nothing to support West's allegations.

Following the said reports by the US and international bodies, many world states have called the UN Security Council pressure against Tehran unjustified, demanding that Iran's case be normalized and returned from the UNSC to the IAEA.

Meantime, a recent study by the Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS), a prestigious American think tank, has found that a military strike on Iran's nuclear facilities "is unlikely" to delay the country's program.



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