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News number: 8806161206

15:01 | 2009-09-07

Science

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New Images of Milky Way's Cousin Released

TEHRAN (FNA)- ESO released striking new images of a nearby galaxy that suggest this hive of stars is spiral galaxy much like our own Milky Way.



ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organization in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory.

Though the galaxy is seen edge-on, observations of NGC 4945 suggest that this hive of stars is a spiral galaxy much like our own, with swirling, luminous arms and a bar-shaped central region, ESO announced in its website.

These resemblances aside, NGC 4945 has a brighter centre that likely harbors a super massive black hole, which is devouring reams of matter and blasting energy out into space.

As NGC 4945 is only about 13 million light-years away in the constellation of Centaurus (the Centaur), a modest telescope is sufficient for skygazers to spot this remarkable galaxy.

NGC 4945's designation comes from its entry number in the New General Catalogue compiled by the Danish-Irish astronomer John Louis Emil Dreyer in the 1880s. James Dunlop, a Scottish astronomer, is credited with originally discovering NGC 4945 in 1826 from Australia.

Other observations have revealed that NGC 4945 has an active galactic nucleus, meaning its central bulge emits far more energy than calmer galaxies like the Milky Way. Scientists classify NGC 4945 as a Seyfert galaxy after the American astronomer Carl K. Seyfert, who wrote a study in 1943 describing the odd light signatures emanating from some galactic cores.

Since then, astronomers have come to suspect that super massive black holes cause the turmoil in the centre of Seyfert galaxies. Black holes gravitationally draw gas and dust into them, accelerating and heating this attracted matter until it emits high-energy radiation, including X-rays and ultraviolet light. Most large, spiral galaxies, including the Milky Way, host a black hole in their centers, though many of these dark monsters no longer actively "feed" at this stage in galactic development.