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News number: 9010171549

15:36 | 2012-01-17

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Ahmadinejad Stresses Iran's Growing Medical Tourism Industry

TEHRAN (FNA)- Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad stressed Iran's high capabilities in medical fields, and added that many people from around the world now choose Iran for receiving medical treatment.



Addressing a conference on medical research here in Tehran on Tuesday, Ahmadinejad said that 30,000 people come to Iran each year to receive medical treatment.

"Medical treatment in Iran is safer, more knowledge-based and cheaper," Ahmadinejad stressed, and added, "Meanwhile there are many cultural attractions in our country."

"Until 8 years ago, many people traveled abroad to receive medical treatment, while now we are accepting guests in some (medical) fields and in fact we have medical tourism," the president underscored.

Iran has taken wide strides in science and technology, particularly in medical and medicinal fields, in recent years.

In a most recent case, Iranian Health Minister Marziyeh Vahid Dastjerdi announced in September that the country would soon start production of 15 types of anti-cancer drugs.

"15 types of monoclonal anti-body drugs are being synthesized with the help of the Scientific Department of the Presidential Office, using hi-tech technology," Vahid Dastjerdi said.

Noting that these anti-cancer drugs are now produced by only two to three western companies, she raised the possibility that the Iran-made monoclonal antibodies would be introduced to the Iranian market within the next two months.

Monoclonal antibody drugs are a relatively new innovation in cancer treatment. While several monoclonal antibody drugs are available for treating certain cancers, the best way to use these new drugs isn't always clear.