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7.1.1 Health and Safety Services

Last updated on:
08/11/2014
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
25.1

This Memo lists the main offices, departments and groups that provide various health and safety services at Stanford.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice Provost and Dean of Research.

1. Environmental Health and Safety

The Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) is the principal health and safety office at Stanford. EH&S works closely with the University Safety Partners (the designated safety officers in the laboratory schools, Land, Buildings and Real Estate [LBRE], and in Residential and Dining Enterprises [R&DE]) and the safety coordinators, safety committees, administrators and faculty in the departments. If you need help or information about health and safety, call EH&S at 723-0448.

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2. Administrative Panels

Stanford University's five Administrative Panels on research compliance assure the institution's compliance with federal regulation of research activities by reviewing those research activities which involve the use of human subjects, laboratory animals, biohazardous agents, recombinant DNA or radiological hazards.

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3. Health and Safety Committee

The University Committee on Health and Safety exercises oversight of health and safety programs at Stanford and SLAC, advises the President on the adequacy of Stanford's health and safety programs, policies and organization, recommends priorities and strategies to promote good health and safety on campus, and fosters coordination among those units at Stanford having operational responsibility for health and safety. This committee also reviews and recommends to the President University-wide policies regarding health and safety matters not addressed by the existing administrative panels.

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4. Other Departments

Other departments play important health and safety roles.

  • Department of Public Safety (Campus Police), 723-9633.
    Primary responsibility for traffic safety, earthquake and emergency planning and police services.
  • Department of Risk Management, 723-4554
    - Administers Stanford's property, liability and vehicle insurance, Workers' Compensation, and self-insured programs and claims
    - Evaluates and identifies financial risks in order to protect the University's assets and resources
    - Provides risk consultation to departments
  • Palo Alto Fire Department 9-911
    Fire suppression services.
  • Santa Clara County Fire Marshal's Office, 917-0767
    Fire inspection services.
  • Stanford Fire Marshal at EH&S 723-0609
    Other fire prevention and code consultation services.
  • 24-Hour Emergency Response Team at EH&S 725-9999
    Emergency services for incidents involving hazardous materials.
  • Other University departments such as LBRE (Buildings and Grounds Maintenance and the Department of Project Management) also have important health and safety functions such as preventive maintenance, repairs, and inspections.
  • Stanford University Medical Center (Stanford Health Care, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and School of Medicine) has its own security service and facilities operations group that respond to emergencies through their "286" alarm or by calling Security Services at 723-7222.

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7.2.1 Emergency/Accident Procedures

Last updated on:
06/15/2008
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
25.2

This Guide Memo is a general compilation of Stanford's emergency procedures, including those for injuries and accidents, fires, earthquakes, and hazardous materials releases and spills. For more detailed information on disaster preparedness, please see the Department Emergency Planning Guidelines published by Environmental Health & Safety or contact Emergency Preparedness, 725-1409. 

Authority: 

This Guide Memo was approved by the Vice Provost and Dean of Research.

1. If an Employee is Injured at Work or a Student is Injured

a. Emergency First Aid
The Palo Alto Fire Department provides emergency first aid and resuscitation. From campus phones dial 911 or 9-911 for assistance.

b. Medical Assistance
(1) Employees (including student employees)
In case of an injury requiring medical attention, medical services designated by Stanford University Risk Management must be used for the first 30 days unless the injured person has previously predesignated* a personal physician in writing.

For serious illness/injury, Stanford Hospital Emergency Room (24-hour service: phone 723-5111) or Prompt Care Unit (8 a.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays; phone 723-2568) may be used if needed. For other medical services, the providers are subject to change with the most recent updates and information available at the Risk Management website or the Occupational Health Center website.

*Predesignation forms may be obtained here or by calling Risk Management at 723-7400.

(2) Students (who are not Stanford employees)
Vaden Health Center, located at 870 Campus Drive. Phone number is 724-2273 (4-CARE), ext. 4. Hours are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday from mid September through mid June.
From mid June to mid September hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. A physician and a mental health counselor are available on call when the health service is closed.

c. Transportation
The Palo Alto Fire Department or Stanford Police Department will arrange for ambulance service if required.

d. Reporting Serious Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses
(1) All Injuries
All injuries must be reported to the Department of Risk Management. See Guide Memo 7.6.1 for information on how to report injuries.
(2) Serious Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses
A serious injury or illness is defined as any accident resulting in:

  • 24 hours or more of inpatient hospitalization
  • loss of any member of the body
  • permanent disfigurement
  • death

After emergency treatment has been administered to the victim, a serious occupational injury or illness must be reported immediately by the supervisor by telephone to the Environmental Health and Safety Department at 723-0448. In the event that the victim is not hospitalized immediately following the accident, but is later hospitalized and the stay is 24 hours or longer, the supervisor must notify the Environmental Health and Safety Department immediately after learning of this change in status. This will enable Environmental Health and Safety to contact the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA). Serious accidents may be investigated by both Environmental Health and Safety and Cal/OSHA.

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2. Preparedness

Supervisors have the specific responsibility to see that individuals for whom they are responsible are trained in proper emergency response procedures and that the work areas for which they are responsible are properly posted with emergency response procedures. Department administrators or building managers are responsible for working with the University Fire Marshall (at EH&S 723-0609) to designate an Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for each department and for arranging departmental emergency response procedures and training.

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3. Fires

Call 9-911 from University phones (911 from pay phones or 286 from the Medical Center) and activate the nearest fire alarm to alert all building occupants. Exit the building according to building evacuation procedures. Gather at the Emergency Assembly Point for your area and wait for the fire department to arrive and to assume command of the scene. Assembled evacuees should try to determine if there is anyone missing, and the department administrator or building manager should advise the fire department if someone is believed to be still inside the building.

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4. Emergency Definitions

Emergency: An unforeseen event that calls for immediate action to protect individuals, the environment, or property.

Health-Threatening Emergency: An emergency in which there is a clear potential for serious injury to a person or release of contaminants to the environment if immediate action is not taken. (If in doubt, consider the emergency health-threatening.)

Non Health-Threatening Emergency:  An emergency in which there is not a clear potential for serious injury to any person. (If unsure whether an emergency is health-threatening or non health-threatening, assume it is health-threatening.)

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5. Procedures for Emergencies Involving Hazardous Materials

In all cases, when any person becomes aware of an emergency involving hazardous materials, regardless of its location:

a. If Health-Threatening
Call 9-911 from University phones (911 from other phones or 286 from the Medical School) and activate the nearest fire alarm if the building needs to be evacuated or if a telephone is unavailable.

  • If involving radiation or radioactive materials call Health Physics at 723-3201.
  • If unsure of the health-threatening nature of the emergency, assume it is health threatening and proceed accordingly.
  • If the emergency is a chemical spill or hazardous material release, in addition to contacting emergency personnel, notify the Principal Investigator responsible for that area as soon as it is practical to do so. If the Principal Investigator is unknown or unavailable then notify the Department or Building Administrator, Safety Committee Chairperson, or Department Chairperson. When possible, leave appropriate messages in each case. (The work and home phone numbers of these people should be posted near every room containing hazardous materials.)

When 9-911 (Police/Fire Communications) or 286 (Stanford University Medical Center Security Office) receives a report of an emergency involving hazardous materials they will notify the Department of Environmental Health and Safety immediately. 9-911 will notify the Health Physics Office in the event of an emergency involving radiation or radioactive materials.

b. If Not Health-Threatening
C
all Environmental Health and Safety at 5-9999 for consulting and clean-up assistance.

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6. Earthquakes and Disasters

Department administrators or building managers should draw up disaster plans for their department or building. This includes establishing an Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for each building, posting evacuation maps, securing building contents, distributing emergency contact information, purchasing or preparing emergency kits, and creating a plan for emergency recovery. For help in drawing up these plans, contact the Environmental Health and Safety Department at 723-0448. Handouts can also be obtained from the Department of Public Safety at 723-0569.

When an earthquake occurs, stay calm. If indoors seek protection under a desk or table; stay away from glass. When the shaking has stopped completely, carefully exit the building according to emergency evacuation procedures for your building. Gather at the Emergency Assembly Point for your area and start to implement your department's emergency plans. (If outdoors, move away from buildings and utility wires. After the shaking stops, report to the Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) in your area.)

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7.3.1 Identifying and Correcting Workplace Hazards

Last updated on:
06/15/2007
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
25.3

This Guide Memo describes supervisory duties mandated by California Senate Bill 198, the Occupational Injury and Illness Prevention Act. These responsibilities for identifying and correcting workplace hazards apply to all supervisors, both faculty and staff, and to all workplaces, including laboratories, classrooms, shops, and offices.

Authority: 

This Guide Memo was approved by the Vice Provost & Dean of Research.

1. Inspections

a. Policy
Supervisors, both faculty and staff, have the specific responsibility to ensure that scheduled, periodic inspections of workplaces are conducted to identify and evaluate workplace hazards and unsafe work practices.

b. Procedures
(1) When to inspect
The frequency of inspections should be proportional to the magnitude of risk posed in the particular workplace. Inspections are also required whenever new substances, processes, procedures, or equipment presenting new, categorically different health and safety hazards are introduced into the workplace. The Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) will assist supervisors in inspectional responsibilities and will conduct independent inspections as necessary.
(2) Keeping Records
Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that records of inspections are kept, including who conducted the inspections, dates, any unsafe conditions or practices found, and corrective actions taken. These records must be maintained for at least one year and available to EH&S or to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) on request. Self inspection checklists and guides and standard forms for inspection record-keeping may be obtained from EH&S (723-0448).

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2. Hazard Correction and Reporting

(Note: this policy is for non-emergency situations only. In case of an emergency or serious health threatening situation, follow the Emergency Response procedures outlined in Guide Memo 7.2.1: Emergency and Accident Procedures.

a. Policies
Means of correcting discovered hazards and/or protecting individuals from hazards are to be implemented promptly. Unsafe conditions that cannot be corrected with resources available to the supervisor or manager must be reported by that supervisor or manager to the next higher level of management.

Any supervisor or manager who becomes aware of a serious concealed danger to the health or safety of individuals shall report this danger promptly to EH&S and to the individuals who may be affected.

Stanford University encourages employees and students to report health and safety hazards to their supervisors, managers, or EH&S. Employees and students shall not be discharged or discriminated against in any manner for bona fide reporting of health and safety hazards to Stanford or to appropriate governmental agencies. Supervisors shall inform employees and students of this policy and encourage reporting of workplace hazards.

b. Procedures
Follow Stanford University procedures for maintenance and repairs and see that work is properly done.

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7.4.1 Health and Safety Training and Communication

Last updated on:
06/15/2009
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
25.4

This Guide Memo describes supervisory duties mandated by California Senate Bill 198, the Occupational Injury and Illness Prevention Act. These responsibilities for health and safety training and communication apply to all supervisors, both faculty and staff, and to all workplaces, including laboratories, classrooms, shops, and offices.

Authority: 

This Guide Memo was approved by the Vice Provost & Dean of Research.

1. Training Responsibilities

Supervisors, both faculty and staff, have the specific responsibility to see that systems for communicating with employees and students about health and safety matters in their jurisdiction are implemented and maintained. Information must be presented in a manner readily understandable to the affected employees and students. Due attention must be paid to levels of literacy and to language barriers. Oral communications should be supplemented with written materials or postings. Whenever appropriate, regulations, statutes and policies affecting employees and students should be available in their workplaces.

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2. When to Train

Employees and students must be trained:

  • When an employee or student first begins work.
  • When an employee or student is given a new assignment for which training has not previously been received.
  • Whenever new hazards are introduced into the workplace by new substances, processes or equipment. (Training is required when a new and different category of hazards is introduced, for example, radiological materials or corrosives, or when a new piece of equipment presents substantially different hazards than already exist.)
  • Whenever the supervisor is made aware of a new or previously unrecognized hazard.

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3. Content of Training

Stanford's training takes place in three tiers:

  • Tier 1 is a general University orientation provided by the Human Resources staff for all new University employees. It includes information on Stanford's health and safety policies and practices, employee health and safety rights and responsibilities, health and safety services at Stanford, and what the employee should generally expect in terms of further training and information from their supervisor or management.
  • Tier 2 training is provided by the school, department or building safety representatives in conjunction with the Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) for employees and students in labs, shops, kitchens, or other workplaces where special hazards may be encountered. Tier 2 includes general information applicable to the school, department, building, service shop, kitchen, or office about safety administration, programs, and procedures.
  • Tier 3 training is provided by the principal investigators, lab directors, shop/kitchen supervisors and class instructors for laboratory researchers and assistants, lab class students, and shop and food service workers. Tier 3 consists of information specific to labs, research groups, and shops regarding the special hazards of their work and the specific protocols and procedures to be performed by the individual.

See the Stanford Safety Manual for more specific information on tier training contents.

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4. Training Resources

EH&S has a safety video library, a collection of safety publications, and technical staff to assist supervisors and departments in implementing training programs. EH&S's Office of Health Physics provides special programs for training in radiological safety. EH&S assists schools and departments, in collaboration with the University Safety Partners, in providing general laboratory safety training to students, staff and faculty. Call EH&S's Communications Office (725-1470) with any questions about training or training materials, or talk to the relevant University Safety Partner about establishing a training program for a particular department.

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5. Keeping Records

Supervisors must document health and safety training and communications, whether conducted in classroom-style, safety meetings, or one-on-one job safety training sessions. Records must be kept of who was trained, who did the training, when the training occurred, and what was taught. Documentation should include safety meeting or training session agendas, sign-up sheets with signatures of attendees, and copies of any written communications. Records of training must be kept for at least one year and be readily available for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for inspection. For guidance on records retention, refer to the Environmental Health and Safety website.

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7.5.1 Health and Safety Performance Standards and Discipline

Last updated on:
06/15/2007
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
25.5

This Guide Memo describes supervisory duties mandated by California Senate Bill 198, the Occupational Injury and Illness Prevention Act. These responsibilities for health and safety performance standards and discipline apply to all supervisors, both faculty and staff, and to all workplaces, including laboratories, classrooms, shops, and offices.

Authority: 

This Guide Memo was approved by the Vice Provost & Dean of Research.

1. Policy

It is the policy of Stanford University to maintain a safe and healthy work environment. Managers and supervisors are responsible for the establishment and maintenance of good health and safety practices. Work rules to assure good health and safety practices are to be promulgated and enforced including through the disciplinary process if necessary.

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2. Guide to Supervisors

To be most effective, rules on health and safety practices should be clearly communicated to all employees: through postings, meetings, training sessions, etc. Job descriptions and performance criteria should clearly state that good health and safety practices are part of the employees' job expectations. Performance appraisals should evaluate the employees' conformance to health and safety rules and recognize good health and safety practices.

Furthermore, each employee should be made to understand from the outset that failure to observe good health and safety practices may subject the employees to disciplinary action up to and including possible termination.

The role of discipline is to impress upon the employees the seriousness and importance of following instructions including the utilization of good health and safety practices.

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7.6.1 Accident and Incident Reporting

Last updated on:
03/15/2013
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
25.6

This Guide Memo lists forms needed to fulfill federal and state requirements concerning accidents, incidents, or exposures to employees in the workplace. It does not cover mental stress claims; contact your local Human Resources office immediately for guidelines on such claims. These policies also apply at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). SLAC employees must report accidents, incidents or exposures to SLAC Medical Department.

Authority: 

Approved by the Assistant Vice President of Risk Management.

1. Benefits Brochure

Detailed information about Stanford University Workers' Compensation benefits is available at the Stanford Risk Management website. 

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3. Report Required for Every Injury

In the event of an employee accident, incident or exposure, the injured or exposed person's supervisor must complete and submit an Accident/Incident/Exposure Report (Form SU-17). In addition, the supervisor must comply with state and federal reporting requirements, including prompt submission of Form SU-17. This form enables Environmental Health and Safety to implement thorough accident investigations to remedy work-related hazards.

Nonemployee accidents require an SU 17-B.

a. Time Limit
The SU-17 must be submitted within 24 hours of the occurrence.

b. Applicability
The SU-17 applies to all employees (full-time, part-time and temporary), as well as to all students, contractors and visitors on campus, whether or not the injured or exposed person received medical attention.

c. Who Signs
The SU-17 must be completed accurately and signed by both the injured or exposed party and his/her supervisor. If the injured or exposed party is not a Stanford employee, the supervisor or manager responsible for the area where the injury, incident, or exposure occurred should sign the SU-17. If it is difficult to obtain the injured or exposed party's signed portion, departments should submit the supervisor's statement immediately, and the injured or exposed party's statement as soon as it is available.

d. Where to Submit
Mail or deliver the original and two copies along with Cal-OSHA Form 5020, if needed (see section 5) to Risk Management, 215 Panama Street, Bldg D, Mail Code 6207. Retain one copy for department files.

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4. Report Required When a Doctor is Seen

An Employee's Claim for Workers' Compensation Benefits (DWC Form 1) must be given immediately to the employee along with the current year Workers' Compensation benefits sheet when a doctor is seen concerning the injury, incident or exposure. Failure to comply with the state requirements may impose significant fines and penalties, charged to the appropriate department. The DWC Form-1 and a detailed instruction sheet are available from Risk Management, 425 Arguello Way, Encina Modular A mailcode 6207, phone 650/723-7400.

a. Time Limit
The DWC Form-1 must be signed by a University representative, and then given or mailed to the employee within 24 hours of the accident, incident or exposure.

b. Applicability
The DWC Form-1 applies to all employees (full-time, part-time and temporary) when the injured or exposed person receives medical attention.

c. Who Signs?
The employer/supervisor/administrator signs the employer section. The injured person is not required to sign.

d. Where to Submit
A copy of the form must be sent to Risk Management for verification of employer obligation.

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5. Additional Report When Medical Assistance Is Needed or One or More Days Are Lost From Work

State law requires that an Employer's Report of Industrial Injury (Cal-OSHA Form 5020) be submitted when an industrial injury or occupational disease results in:

  • lost time beyond the day of injury, or
  • medical treatment by a physician in a clinic, hospital, emergency room, or medical office.

Cal-OSHA Form 5020 is required for payment for medical services and is the basis for any disability claim under Workers' Compensation Insurance. See Guide Memo 2.1.7: Sick Time, concerning absences due to work-related disabilities and medical coverage under Workers' Compensation Insurance.

a. Typed Entry Required
The Cal-OSHA Form 5020 must be typed.

b. Time Limit
The Cal-OSHA Form 5020 must be submitted within 24 hours of the occurrence.

c. Applicability
The Cal-OSHA Form 5020 applies to Stanford employees only. This includes part-time and temporary Stanford employees, but does not include independent contractors; persons employed by temporary help/employment agencies or vendors; or employees of other employers on campus, such as Stanford Bookstore.

d. Who Signs?
The injured employee's supervisor or acting supervisor signs the Cal-OSHA Form 5020.

e. Where to Submit
Mail or deliver the original and two copies of Cal-OSHA Form 5020, accompanied by the original and two copies of the SU-17, and the DWC Form-1 signed by a University representative, to Risk Management, 215 Panama Street, Building D, Mail Code 6207.

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6. Workers' Compensation Lost Time Report

A Workers' Compensation Lost Time Report (Form SU-16) must be submitted by the supervisor or administrator to Risk Management when an employee has lost one full day or more following the day of an accident, or the first day of a work-related illness. Its purpose is to comply with Federal/State OSHA log requirements and to stop temporary disability payment for workers' compensation. The form includes detailed instructions for completion. Submit form SU-16 online when the employee returns to work.

 

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7.7.1 Medical Examinations

Last updated on:
03/15/2008
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
25.7

This Guide Memo serves as an overview of Stanford's medical evaluation procedures.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice Provost & Dean for Research.

Applicability: 

The California Occupational Health and Safety Act and California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and other federal regulations require that employers provide programs of medical surveillance for employees in certain positions. These programs, which may include examinations and testing before a new employee starts work as well as periodic medical evaluations, for employees engaged in certain occupations or working under certain conditions. While Stanford is required to make such examinations available, only certain employees—e.g., asbestos workers, employees required to use respirators, and hazardous materials Emergency Response Team members—are required by regulations to be provided and undergo medical examinations.

1. Policy

Stanford University evaluates and monitors, through its programs of medical surveillance, the health of Stanford University faculty, staff, and students who are exposed to certain hazardous materials and situations as defined by law and University policy.

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2. Criteria for Participation

Medical examinations of various kinds are available to employees working in conditions outlined below. Examinations may be recommended for other personnel based on job duties, exposures, individual medical histories, departmental accident and injury experience, and other safety standards.

a. Asbestos Exposure
Examinations before a new employee starts work and periodic examinations thereafter are required for employees assigned to work with asbestos.

b. Biohazardous Agents
Those working with biohazardous agents at biosafety level 2 or 3, those working with potentially infectious materials, or those working with animals possibly carrying zoonotic diseases may need to participate in a medical surveillance program.

c. Clinic Personnel
University Clinic personnel are required to have physical examinations when they are hired and yearly tuberculosis tests. Clinic employees working with chemotherapeutic drugs also receive yearly examinations.

d. Hazardous Chemical Exposure
Those exposed to certain levels of carcinogens or other hazardous chemicals in laboratories or to specific toxic and hazardous substances as specified in OSHA regulations may require medical monitoring under certain conditions. For updated, specific information on requirements for monitoring and participation in the medical surveillance program, please call the Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) at 723-0448.

e. Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team
Examinations are required before a new hazardous material emergency response team member, expected to perform work in response to the release of hazardous materials, including leaks or spills, starts work and annually thereafter.

f. Laser Exposure
Eye examinations are provided to those who will be exposed to class 3b or 4 laser beams prior to beginning their assignment. Call Health Physics for information at 723-3201.

g. Noise Exposure
Audiometric tests, consisting of baseline medical examinations and annual examinations thereafter, are available to those who may be exposed to noise levels equal to or exceeding an 8 hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels.

h. Police Officers
Examinations before a new police officer begins work are required by the Stanford University Department of Public Safety (SUDPS).

i. Respirator Users
Examinations before a new employee starts work and annual medical evaluations thereafter are required for those who will be using a respirator as part of their work.

j. Other Recommendations
In addition to the regulated occupations outlined above, examinations are recommended for employees whose work requires strenuous physical activity, including laborers, athletic instructors, equipment and machine operators, delivery persons, freight handlers, and truck drivers. Also included are jobs requiring acute hearing, sustained visual acuity, and any other work situation in which physical condition is critical. Supervisors or employees needing assistance in determining the applicability of criteria should ask their departmental safety representative or call EH&S at 723-0448.

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3. Who Administers the Program

a. The Department of Environmental Health and Safety
EH&S implements University-wide policies and procedures, and operates an on-site Occupational Health Center for employees which provides consultation and assistance to departments upon request.

b. Schools/Departments
Each University school/department administers the program for those faculty, staff and students covered by this policy. This includes scheduling the examinations, processing the papers, and keeping records.

c. Supervisors
Supervisors in each department determine which of their employees are within the criteria for participation, and ensure that those employees receive the appropriate medical examinations. EH&S can assist supervisors in determining if a medical examination is appropriate.

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4. Procedures

a. Payment for Services
Medical examination expenses are charged to the employing department or project, unless previous arrangements have been made with The Stanford University Occupational Health Center (SUOHC). SUOHC will perform journal transfers for the costs of medical examinationsof Stanford employees and prospective employees. All departments must arrange medical examinations with the SUOHC.

b. Making Appointments
The department schedules the medical appointment with the SUOHC (650-725-5308). If an appointment cannot be kept, it is the responsibility of the department or individual to notify SUOHC and reschedule the appointment. If SUOHC is not notified at least 24 hours in advance, the department may be charged for the missed appointment.

c. New Employees
Employees entering certain jobs, (e.g., respirator users, asbestos workers, police officers, hazardous materials emergency response team members, etc.) may be required to successfully complete a job-related physical examination before starting work. Employment in these positions is conditional upon satisfactory completion of the medical evaluation, and candidates for these positions should be so advised.

d. Record-keeping
Currently, all records of medical examinations conducted under this policy are maintained at the SUOHC for the duration of an individual's participation in the Medical Surveillance Program and in accordance with State and Federal requirements.

The examining clinician is expected to review the results of the examination with each program participant and provide appropriate referral(s) for abnormal findings.

SUOHC will mail or email one copy of the medical clearance form to EH&S. The clearance form outlines the participant's ability to perform a particular job, work in a potentially hazardous environment, and/or wear a respirator. SUOHC also sends a copy of the clearance form directly to the employing department/laboratory. If there are restrictions in an individual's ability to perform his/herjob, the supervisor should contact EH&S to determine the proper course of action. If necessary, Human Resources may be consulted.

Each department with employees participating in the medical surveillance program must maintain a Medical Surveillance Program file which contains the clearance forms for all program participants. An additional copy is also kept at SUOHC.

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5. Employee Access to Records

Employees or their designated representatives may obtain access to or a copy of medical records within 15 days of a request, without cost.

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7.8.1 Health and Safety Reference Guide

Last updated on:
03/15/2008
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
25.8

This Guide Memo contains lists of reference materials and phone numbers departments can call for specific health and safety questions.

1. Policy Statements

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4. Contact Numbers and Sites

Department of Environmental Health & Safety, 723-0448.

Stanford U. Medical Center Security (servicing the School of Medicine), 723-7222

School of Medicine (24 hour emergency response), 286 (dialing from SOM)

Department of Public Safety Police/Fire/Medical Response:

Office of Risk Management: 723-4554

School/Department Safety Partners

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