Feature Stories

Stanford-India Biodesign fellows Debayan Saha, Shashi Ranjan and Harsh Sheth / Kurt Hickman

Biomedical innovation takes off in India, with Stanford roots

A program that blends India's frugal mindset with Stanford's entrepreneurial atmosphere has generated low-cost solutions to high-tech medical needs.

illustration of human head showing brain and robot with wired brain exposed / Shutterstock

Building a brain: Stanford neuroscientists and engineers work together

Computers will one day match our own mental agility; learning, navigating and performing complex interactions all on scant power. But getting to that point will require neuroscientists and engineers to reverse engineer our least understood organ – the brain.

The Chocolate Heads dance group

Unexpected Intersections: Interdisciplinary collaborations

Far-flung collaborations flourish at Stanford: Physicists create dance performances, biologists and musicians expand our understanding of epilepsy, and engineers speed environmental research. 

aerial view of Central Energy Facility in November 2014 as it nears completion/Todd Quam

Stanford Energy System Innovations: New state-of-the-art energy system for campus

The comprehensive system incorporates solar power for electricity, combined with heat recovery, to cut greenhouse gas emissions 68 percent and fossil fuel 65 percent.

Photo: Stanford water purification technology

Water Solutions: Promising approaches to global freshwater challenges

As the world's population grows, so does the demand for – and threat to – the planet's freshwater supply. Stanford researchers are developing a range of promising solutions to freshwater challenges around the globe.

Richie Sapp

Beyond the classroom: Research opportunities for Stanford undergraduates

Faculty mentors introduce students to the rigors of academic research in every field from engineering to the humanities.

Cybersecurity research at Stanford

Stanford's broad network of thought leaders are taking an interdisciplinary approach to tackling the range of challenges and opportunities created by ever-changing technical advances. Here are just a few examples of how Stanford is working to address the world's cybersecurity challenges.

Photo: President Hennessy and Mark Zuckerberg

Stanford 2014: Year in review

From "My Fair Lady" to the Nobel Prize, a lot happened at Stanford in 2014. Here are just a few of the amazing highlights of the year.

Imagining the universe: cosmology in art and science

Organized by an interdisciplinary consortium drawing on departments and programs from across the university and launched in October 2014, the series brings together scientists, artists and humanists to explore the nature of the universe.

car smashed by falling debris /Stacy H. Geiken

Twenty-five years later: The legacy of the Loma Prieta quake at Stanford

Stanford remembers the earthquake that rocked the campus and spurred wealth of research aimed at reducing quakes' destruction.

Photo: W.E. Moerner

2014 Nobel Laureate W.E. Moerner

Professor W.E. Moerner has been awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for using fluorescence to extend the limits of the light microscope. His work has made it possible to study molecular processes in real time.

students on the Quad / L.A. Cicero

Stanford freshmen embark on new intellectual journey

The Thinking Matters program is designed to help students transition from high school to college by introducing them to multidisciplinary scholarship.

Karl Deisseroth / L.A. Cicero

Stanford's Karl Deisseroth wins Keio Prize

The medical science prize is awarded for his work in optogenetics – using light to control the activity of the brain. The technique is used to understand the brain's wiring and to unravel behavior.

Stanford solar car

Stanford takes energy research to the limits

Building a solar car is one way Stanford students and researchers are developing next-generation energy sources and improving efficiency.

gears turning in an image of the brain

Stanford's Symbolic Systems bridges gap between humanity, technology

In an interdisciplinary study of "the science of the mind," students examine the human-computer relationship, and how to design technology that works well with users.

Photo: Bill and Melinda Gates

Commencement 2014

At Stanford's 123rd Commencement, Bill and Melinda Gates, co-chairs of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, urged graduates to change the world through optimism and empathy.

Steve Palumbi diving at coral reef / Courtesy of Dan Griffin and Stave Palumbi

Stanford marine scientist's quest to save coral

More than half the world's coral reefs have died since the dawn of the industrial age, due to human activities and ever increasing ocean temperatures. Steve Palumbi has a plan for bringing them back to life.

beyond the farm

Beyond the Farm, Stanford spirit crops up in many places

Through an annual day of volunteering, students, staff and alumni extend Stanford's spirit of service to communities around the world.

Stanford computers

Solving big questions requires big computation

Understanding the origins of our solar system, the future of our planet or humanity requires complex calculations run on high-power computers.

Campus artist with paints / Photo: L.A. Cicero

Made at Stanford: A celebration of campus art and artists

Faculty and students celebrate the creativity at the heart of a 21st-century education.

Photo: Start.Home at Jasper Ridge

The green home of tomorrow

An enterprising team of Stanford students has designed a low-cost, solar-powered home that could lead the home-building industry to a more sustainable future and guide homeowners toward greener behavior.

Scorched earth

Behind the scenes of an international climate report, with Stanford scientists

Stanford's Chris Field has spent five years leading a team of international scientists as they prepared a major United Nations report on  the world's climate. The hours were long, the company was good and the science is crucial.

Iguana on Galapagos Island

Stanford group explores tension between conservation, development in Galapagos Islands

The group witnessed how the Galapagos have been impacted by humans and analyzed efforts to preserve and restore endangered flora and fauna.

Thomas S├╝dhof (Medicine) and Michael Levitt (Chemistry)

2013 Nobel Prizes: Thomas Südhof and Michael Levitt

The early morning hours brought two rounds of exciting news from Stockholm this week. Thomas Südhof won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and Michael Levitt was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

NSO 2013

New Student Orientation 2013

During New Student Orientation, incoming freshmen and transfer students dive into the academic, social and cultural life at Stanford. Join us in greeting the newest members of the Stanford community as they begin their exciting journey on the Farm.