Environment

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Sillhouette of corn with a large sun. Photo: Dave Weaver/Shutterstock.

Global warming 'hiatus' never happened, Stanford scientists say

A new study reveals that the evidence for a recent pause in the rate of global warming lacks a sound statistical basis.

Professor and students on the bank of a small creek. / Photo: L.A. Cicero

Stanford researchers look to stormwater as a solution for semiarid regions

Coordinated work with local and federal agencies could provide a template for capture and reuse of stormwater in dry regions such as the American West.  

Aerial view of Lake Oroville in July 2015 showing low water level due to drought conditions in California / Paul Hames/DWR

A very strong El Niño is increasing the likelihood of a wet winter during California's record drought, Stanford scientists say

But it might not be enough to end California's worst drought on record, say Earth scientists Noah Diffenbaugh and Daniel Swain.  

Homestake Mine / Rachel Harris

Stanford scientists see how the brain makes environmental decisions

Brain scans reveal that negative emotional responses can powerfully drive decisions to protect environmental resources.

Polly Courtice / Courtesy Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership

Stanford announces 2015 Stanford Bright Award recipient

The annual prize recognizes unheralded individuals who have made significant contributions to global sustainability. Polly Courtice has won the 2015 award for her efforts in guiding thousands of business leaders to more sustainable business practices.

Antarctic coastline / Andreea Dragomir/Shutterstock

Ice sheets may be more resilient than thought, say Stanford scientists

Stanford study suggests that today's ice sheets may be more resilient to increased carbon dioxide levels than previously thought.

Recycled water that has been through a three-step purification process. /Photo: Orange County Water District

Stanford soil sleuths solve mystery of arsenic-contaminated water

Stanford Earth scientist Scott Fendorf helped discover how trace amounts of arsenic were moving from sediments into groundwater aquifers in Southern California.  

western black-legged tick

Stanford researchers find surprising level of tick-borne disease risk on local trails

Study reveals mysterious pathogen in higher concentrations than thought in trailside ticks in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Spectrometry instruments at SLAC

Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project awards $9.3 million for innovative energy research

GCEP has awarded scientists at Stanford and four other universities funding to develop a suite of promising energy technologies.

4 students who received energy innovation grants

Student teams win grants to commercialize Stanford energy inventions

Building on the success of its first year, the Innovation Transfer Program at the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy is financially supporting 11 new teams comprised mostly of Stanford students and recent graduates trying to put university research to work.