At a glance

Cecil H. Green Library

The National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC) met outside Shepherdstown, West Virginia at the National Conservation Training Center on September 1-2, 2015.  The full report of the meeting including the Powerpoints from the subcommittees and lightning sessions are available on the NGAC Website.  The NGAC is a Federal Advisory Committee that reports to the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC).  Our role is to provide advice and recommendations related to the national geospatial program and the development of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure. 

Mendelssohn. Sechs Lieder. Breitkopf, ca. 1846 (detail)

A sampling of printed music covers in the Music Library exhibit cases celebrate the art of lithography, providing examples of decorative frames and borders as well as scenes depicting various subjects. The nineteenth century saw a shift in music printing methods from engraving to lithography, a printing technique which allowed for increasingly fine decorative detail as is reflected in the covers on display. Artistic renderings of pictorial scenes, fanciful borders, and varieties of fonts helped attract buyers; advertised the skills of the artist; and, when prominently displayed on the parlor piano, evidenced the refined taste of the household.

Welcome to Leith movie banner
Sundance Film Festival's "Welcome to Leith", a documentary about a North Dakota town facing an attempted takeover by extremists, opens today in theaters across North America AND is screening on Kanopy from today. 
 
Welcome to Leith chronicles the attempted takeover of a small town by notorious white supremacist Craig Cobb. As his behavior becomes more threatening, tensions soar, and the residents desperately look for ways to expel their unwanted neighbor. With incredible access to both longtime residents of Leith and white supremacists, the film examines a small community in the plains struggling for sovereignty against an extremist vision. 
 
Kanopy  is providing access to this film to Stanford users.  Watch now
Theremin demonstrating his instrument, Stanford University, 1991

Earlier this year, I reported on recent work the Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) had undertaken to preserve video footage of Leon Theremin's visit to Stanford in 1991. In addition to participating in a symposium during his visit, hosted by the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), Theremin was also the guest of honor at a concert held in Frost Amphitheater on September 27, 1991 during the Stanford Centennial Finale Weekend. The video footage preserved by the ARS earlier in the year unfortunately only included part of this notable concert. It was found to be missing some key performances, including an arrangement of Rachmaninov's Vocalise, featuring Theremin's daughter Natasha Theremin playing the vocal parts on her father's instrument, accompanied by Max Mathews conducting the orchestral parts with his radio batons. This footage was presumed lost...until now.