Research Opportunities Listings

Overview

  • Current listings appear below.
  • For questions regarding specific research opportunities, use the contacts as directed in the listing, as UAR staff does not have this information.
  • To request for a listing to be posted, please click here.

Current Listings

Project Title:  Undergraduate Researcher

Department/Program: Stanford Criminal Justice Center

School: Stanford Law School

Contact: Debbie Mukamal (dmukamal@law.stanford.edu

Description:   The research involves examining large numbers of police arrest reports to determine whether the arrests were influenced by racial biases of police officers. The work will involve training in how to read and code large amounts of data, with the opportunity to better understand the methodologies of empirical research and gain substantive knowledge of the 4th Amendment. Students will also have an opportunity to work alongside Stanford Law School students and to be mentored by Stanford Law School and criminal law expert Professor Robert Weisberg. The work will take place during the remainder of the Fall quarter and possibly through Winter quarter, and the expectation would be about 8 hours per week for six to seven weeks. Students might be able to elect to do the work through an independent study course for academic credit, as part of an individual research stipend, or on a pro bono basis.

The preferred qualifications include:

  • At least junior class status
  • Some background in qualitative research and coding
  • Demonstrated interest in or experience in criminal justice
Contact Instructions or Preferences:  Applicants should send resume, transcript,a nd brief statement indicating relevant background to Debbie Mukamal (dmukamal@law.stanford.edu
 

Posted on 10/7/2015

 

Project Title:  Research Assistant - Excel

Department/Program: Marketing 

School: Graduate School of Business

Contact: Malinda Summers (malindas@stanford.edu)

Description:   To assist faculty research, specifically to code data on various dimensions such as creativity level, novelty, functionality, and goal attainment mindset type. This is a simple job (to code data for its creativity level), but quite labor-intensive.

  • Skill Set: Good at excel, and very detailed when it comes to data entry and coding.
  • Start Date: ASAP. End Date: Spring 2016

Contact Instructions or Preferences:  Email a resume to Malinda Summers (malindas@stanford.edu)

Posted on 10/7/2015

 

Project Title:  Media Polarization Over Time

Department/Program: Management Science and Engineering / Computer Science 

School: Engineering

Contact: Professor Sharad Goel (scgoel@stanford.edu)

Description:   Data-driven research project on identifying and quantifying polarization in news media outlets over time. The first phase of the project involves investigating and annotating historical news corpora to inform the subsequent statistical analysis.

Contact Instructions or Preferences:  Email Professor Sharad Goel (scgoel@stanford.edu) with questions or interest.

Posted on 10/7/2015

 

Position Title:  Undergraduate Research Assistant

Department/Program: Management Science and Engineering / Computer Science 

School: Engineering

Contact: Professor Itai Ashlagi (iashlagi@stanford.edu)

Description:   Research project on market design and school choice. Working with faculty on a data project. A few meetings on campus and most work can be done remotely.

  •  Coding skills are needed.
  •  10-20 hrs a week for around a month (although this or a similar  project may continue further).

Contact Instructions or Preferences:  Email Professor Itai Ashlagi (iashlagi@stanford.edu) with questions or interest.

Posted on 9/21/2015

 

Project Title:  Investigation of wound-healing at the single cell level using microfluidics-based microsurgery

Department/Program: Mechanical Engineering (in collaboration with UCSF Biochemistry)

School: Engineering

Contact: Professor Sindy Tang  (sindy@stanford.edu)

Description:   Wound healing is critical for survival in all living things, including humans. It is also the key feature that distinguishes living from non-living matter. Understanding how a cell, the basic structural unit of all living things, heals is important for understanding how some diseases such as heart and muscle failures develop. Due to the small size of a cell, a key challenge is the lack of a tool that can wound cells in a systematic and scalable manner. 

The immediate goal of the project is to develop a new micro-engineering platform and to establish a standardized procedure for wounding cells and for measuring the healing efficiency. This platform enables the study of the molecular and mechanical mechanisms that underlie wound healing. The broader significance and importance of this project is the understanding of the way cells repair wounds. Ultimately, this knowledge will be useful for understanding wound-induced diseases in humans, and will shed light on how to repair them in more efficient manners. 

This project is in collaboration with UCSF Biochemistry. Students will learn techniques in microfluidics, microscopy, cell culture and basic biochemistry.

 

Contact Instructions or Preferences:  Email Professor Sindy Tang  (sindy@stanford.eduwith questions or interest. To apply, email Professor Tang with the following information: 

  1. Do you have any research experience? If so please describe. If not, describe what experimental or hands-on lab experience you might have from coursework or other activities.
  2. Your CV listing relevant classes and experiences. 
 

Posted on 9/23/2015

 

Disclaimer: UAR sponsors these listings as a service to the Stanford community. Listing on this page in no way indicates a UAR endorsement of the research position or of undergraduates who may be applying for these positions.