Stanford in the News

This is the real unemployment rate

This article is a guest post written by Ed Lazear, professor at the Graduate School of Business and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, on the two measures of the country's employment situation: the widely reported unemployment rate, the proportion of the labor force that is without a job, and the employment rate, the proportion of the working-age population (16 and above) that has a job.

What's driving inequality: CEO pay or company success?

This story features a new paper co-authored by Nicholas Bloom, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research; David J. Price, doctoral student in economics; Jae Song of the Social Security Administration; Fatih Guvenen of the University of Minnesota and Till von Wachter of the University of California, Los Angeles, which found that while incomes of the highest-paid workers (e.g., those earning more than 90 percent or 99 percent of all others) had grown faster than the median, they had not grown faster than those of their co-workers. Quotes Bloom.

How to apologize without looking weak

This article quotes Jeffrey Pfeffer, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on how we instinctively respect strength, confidence and assurance, although we think we want apologies from those who have harmed us.

'Leadership qualities' vs. competence: Which matters more?

This is an interview with Lindred Greer, assistant professor at the Graduate School of Business, on her study with researchers at Stanford and at Erasmus University about which set of qualities - leadership qualities or what is actually required from the people leading teams and other working groups - matters most to team performance.

Tackling plastic pollution with worms

This article features study findings by researchers at Stanford and in Beijing, China, that mealworms can safely eat Styrofoam and other types of plastic and while deriving energy from the process. Quotes co-author Wei-Min Wu, senior research engineer in civil and environmental engineering, and Craig Criddle, professor of civil and environmental engineering.

School vs. society in America's failing students

This article quotes Martin Carnoy, professor of education, on a recent study he co-authored with Emma García from the Economic Policy Institute in Washington and Tatiana Khavenson from the Institute of Education at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, which suggests that socioeconomic deficits impose a particularly heavy burden on American schools.

16-year-olds in D.C. could vote for president in 2016, under proposal

This article quotes Nathaniel Persily, professor of law, on how the legal argument against allowing younger residents of the nation's capital to vote in federal elections could be tenuous.

In swimming, jellyfish and lampreys really pull their weight

This article features new research from researchers at Stanford and at the Marine Biological Laboratory, which found that jellyfish and lampreys both generate areas of low pressure that force water past their bodies, instead of creating high-pressure zones by pushing against the water. Quotes John Dabiri, professor of civil and environmental engineering and of mechanical engineering, and senior author of the study.

Teens spend a 'mind-boggling' 9 hours a day using media, report says

This article quotes James Steyer, professor (consulting) in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, on the "mind-boggling" volume of media technology that children are exposed to on a daily basis. Steyer also cites Stanford study findings that found dramatic differences in cognitive control and the ability to process information between heavy media multitaskers and light media multitaskers.

What Singapore's plan for an aging population can teach the United States

This article quotes Laura Carstensen, professor of psychology and director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, on how countries should be looking for ways to improve the experience of aging at different points of the life cycle.

SAP Chief Bill McDermott embarks on health care mission after losing his eye

This article quotes Paul Saffo, associate professor (consulting) in mechanical engineering, on how people are passionate about the "quantified self," or better health through body sensors and computation.

Why university research is more important than ever

This article cites President John Hennessy, commenting that uncertainty over future federal research support to universities poses a grave risk to the many advances that have helped Stanford fuel the Silicon Valley innovation engine.

Is there a silver lining to Citizens United?

This article quotes Nathaniel Persily, professor of law, suggesting that legislation boosting the role of small donors could increase political polarization because there is evidence that such donors are "more ideologically motivated" than others.

College graduation may be partly determined by your genes

This article describes a study of siblings' educational attainment by Ben Domingue, assistant professor of education.

Why tech firms are scrambling against Europe's net neutrality bill

This article quotes Barbara van Schewick, professor of law, among those opposed to the European Union's proposed rules for the Internet.

Climate change will be an economic disaster for rich and poor, new study says

This article features a recent study co-authored by Marshall Burke, assistant professor of Earth system science and center fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies; Sol Hsiang of the Global Policy Lab; and Edward "Ted" Miguel of the University of California, Berkeley, on how climate change will affect the global economy.

Yellen, consensus-builder, needs to send strong signal at Fed meet

This article quotes John Taylor, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on the need to make a choice about raising interest rates.

From Shirley Bassey to Sam Smith, Bond songs remain a pop oddity

This is an interview with Adrian Daub, associate professor of German studies, and Charles Kronengold, assistant professor of music, on their book "The James Bond Songs: Pop Anthems of Late Capitalism."

Inside Startup U: How Stanford develops entrepreneurial students

This article features entrepreneurship at Stanford, and quotes or mentions several scholars and other members of the Stanford community, including President John L. Hennessy. Cites a study by Chuck Eesley, assistant professor of management science and engineering, and William F. Miller, professor emeritus of computer science and at the Graduate School of Business, and senior fellow emeritus at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

Quarterly earnings reports can still move markets

This article quotes Maureen McNichols, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on how earnings reports are still affecting the markets in a significant way, even more than they did five or 10 or 20 years ago.

The myth of Putin's strategic genius

This article is written by Michael McFaul, director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, professor of political science and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, recommending that the United States adopt a comprehensive strategy to minimize the negative consequences of Russia's actions and maximize the positive ones of the United States.

As the climate gets hotter, will everyone work less?

This article features a new study co-authored by Marshall Burke, assistant professor of Earth system science and center fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies; Edward Miguel, visiting associate professor of economics at Stanford and associate professor of economics at University of California, Berkeley; and Solomon Hsiang of UC Berkeley, which found that a nation's productivity declined as its climate got hotter, based on economic data from 1960 to 2010 in 166 countries.

Watch Stanford's self-driving DeLorean burn rubber in the name of research

This article features autonomous car MARTY and quotes Chris Gerdes, professor of mechanical engineering.

How to turn 'pure scientist's' ideas into policy

This article describes policy recommendations by Raj Chetty, professor of economics.

On gun laws, we must get the history right

This article is written by Priya Satia, associate professor of history.