Election 2016

Stanford scholars offer insight and perspectives on Election 2016 through the Wide Angle project and stories about their research on a wide variety of political and democratic issues.

Stanford scholars bring imaginative, new approaches to solving issues that our society faces. During the 2016 election, this collective knowledge offers insight for voters. These elections are breaking new ground on several fronts, from the voting experience to primary systems and democratic law. With this page, Stanford features content from Wide Angle, a project that offers scholarly, nonpartisan perspectives on the forces shaping the election as well as stories on election-related research and scholarship. This site offers expertise and analysis only, and is not intended to support or endorse any political candidate or cause.

Wide Angle Election 2016 logo

Wide Angle: Election 2016 will tap Stanford experts for scholarly analysis and insights on the forces shaping the election and the challenges ahead. The ongoing series of 3-minute videos and interviews with Stanford faculty is designed to help us understand what is new, different and unique about this moment in history.

Rising Latino vote

History Professor Emeritus Albert Camarillo explains why the Latino vote in the presidential 2016 election is likely to have great impact on the outcome and results.

View Q&A with Al Camarillo (PDF)

Immigration debate affects children

History Professor Emeritus Albert Camarillo says that key questions in the immigration debate regarding native-born children and separation of families remain unresolved and problematic.

View Q&A with Al Camarillo (PDF)

Democracy depends on deliberation

History Professor Jack Rakove says that the value of deliberation, a founding principle of the Republic, has been deeply damaged by primaries and professional politicians.

View Q&A with Jack Rakove (PDF)

Stronger presidency than ever

History Professor Jack Rakove says the presidency has emerged as the strongest of the three government branches while Congress is seemingly paralyzed by partisanship.

View Q&A with Jack Rakove (PDF)

More Wide Angle election 2016 coverage


Election 2016 Events


Project Collaborators

Wide Angle: Election 2016 is a collaboration between Worldview Stanford, Stanford University Communications and Stanford Online.

Stanford Worldview Logo

Stanford Vice Provost for Teaching & Learning logo

Stanford Continuing Studies logo

Stanford News Service logo

Election 2016 News

Stanford scholars offer expert analysis on election year politics and issues.

Hispanic voters increasingly influential in U.S. presidential elections

Hispanic voters are poised to have an unprecedented influence on the 2016 election,  Stanford historian Albert Camarillo said.

Presidency has emerged as strongest of three branches of U.S. government, Stanford historian says

Jack Rakove offers a long-term perspective on some of the changes and challenges facing the U.S. political system.

Stanford expert says 2016 election reflects new trends in money, media and polarization

From media and money to political polarization, Stanford law Professor Nate Persily identifies fundamental changes that could have lasting effects.

Election 2016

Stanford scholars offer insight and perspectives on Election 2016 through the Wide Angle project and stories about their research on a wide variety of political and democratic issues.

More election 2016 news