Science & Technology

Young children have intuitions of great teachers

Even at a young age, children know that deciding what to teach is as important as knowing how to teach. This ability to instruct each other could explain why humans are so adaptable.

Stanford Engineering —

How fake news spreads like a real virus

If we understand how disinformation percolates, perhaps we can help curb its transmission, say cyber-risk researchers at Stanford Engineering.

Interactive map shows nature’s contributions to people

The researchers set out to understand where nature contributes the most to people and how many people may be affected by future changes. By 2050, up to 5 billion people could be at higher risk of water pollution, coastal storms and underpollinated crops.

Archaea hold clues to ancient ocean temperatures

Scientists at Stanford have identified molecules that tough microbes use to survive in warming waters, opening a window more broadly into studying conditions in ancient seas.

Infrared vision for immunotherapy

A new technique employs a bright infrared light that can pass through millimeters of tissue to illuminate tumors deep inside the body.

New patterns of brain development discovered

Neuroscientists had thought parts of the brain associated with reading and face recognition shrunk as children grow. In fact, they may be growing electrical insulation that makes their brains more efficient.

Bringing neuroscience to bear on addiction policy

Keith Humphreys founded the Stanford Network on Addiction Policy to help bring more science to debates over drug policy. He talked to Stanford News about why he started SNAP and how it works.

Dancing with microbes in a museum

Scientists at Stanford and the Exploratorium developed an immersive exhibit where visitors can dance with living cells.