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1 - 10 of 17 results for: GERMAN ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GERMAN 103N: Why Humans Matter

We consider various mythic and religious conceptions of the human from antiquity to Renaissance humanism, key documents of modern secular humanism, and literary works that raise probing questions about humanity. What is peculiar to humans against the foil of animal life forms? Is there a human nature at all, or perhaps a human calling, that might transcend differences among people? Contemporary debates about the limits of the human species, the aspiration to overcome such limits through science, and ecological challenges to traditional views of humans' place in the world.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dornbach, M. (PI)

GERMAN 116: Writing About Germany: New Topics, New Genres

Writing about various topics in German Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, start-ups in Germany. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Berlin or their internship. Fulfills the WIM requirement for German Studies majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 124: Introduction to German Lyric Poetry

Introduction to lyric poetry in German from the 18th century to the present. Readings include poems by Goethe, Holderlin, Brentano, Eichendorff, Heine, Rilke, Trakl, Celan, Brecht. Ways of thinking about and thinking with poetry. Focus on poetic form, voice, figural language, and the interaction of sensory registers. Taught in German, with attention to discussion and writing skills. Prerequisite: Gerlang 1-3 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dornbach, M. (PI)

GERMAN 131: What is German Literature?

This course covers material from the fairy tales of German romanticism, expressionist poetry and painting, literary responses to Nazi Germany and reflections on a unified Germany. Exploring the shifting relationships between cultural aesthetics, entertainment, historical context, and "what is German", we will cover roughly 250 years of literary and artistic production, social and political upheavals, as well as the lives of numerous authors, both male and female. Taught in German. Prerequisite: One year of German language at Stanford or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Eshel, A. (PI)

GERMAN 154: Poetic Thinking Across Media (COMPLIT 154B, COMPLIT 354B, GERMAN 354, JEWISHST 144B)

Even before Novalis claimed that the world must be romanticized, thinkers, writers, and artists wanted to perceive the human and natural world poetically. The pre- and post-romantic poetic modes of thinking they created are the subject of this course. Readings include Ecclestias, Zhaozhou Congshen, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Kafka, Benjamin, Arendt, and Sontag. This course will also present poetic thinking in the visual arts--from the expressionism of Ingmar Bergman to the neo-romanticism of Gerhard Richter.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track. Majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature, with particular focus on the question of value: what, if anything, does engagement with literary works do for our lives? Issues include aesthetic self-fashioning, the paradox of tragedy, the paradox of caring, the truth-value of fiction, metaphor, authorship, irony, make-believe, expression, edification, clarification, and training. Readings are drawn from literature and film, philosophical theories of art, and stylistically interesting works of philosophy. Authors may include Sophocles, Chaucer, Dickinson, Proust, Woolf, Borges, Beckett, Kundera, Charlie Kaufman; Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas; Plato, Montaigne, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 191: German Capstone Project

Each student participates in a capstone interview and discussion with a panel of the German Studies faculty on topics related to German cultural and literary analysis. In prepration for the interview/discussion, students submit written answers to a set of questions based on several authentic cultural texts in German. The written answers, normally in English, should be well-formed and coherent. Within the interview/discussion, students must demonstrate a further understanding of the topic(s) posed, through cogent argument.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 220: German Literature 1: How Stories are Told (ca. 1170-1600) (GERMAN 320)

This seminar offers a survey of medieval and early modern German literature and culture from ca.1170 to 1600. Genres include heroic epic, romance, lyric poetry, and mysticism as well as the popular literary forms characteristic of Reformation culture. We will pay special attention to the changing strategies of storytelling across time, genre, and medium. Discussion in English. All texts are available in modern German or English translation.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 239: Queer Theory (FEMGEN 239)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students and advanced undergraduates to the core texts of queer theory. Topics will include: the relationship between queer theory and feminism, between queer theory and psychoanalysis, and between queer theory and gay and lesbian history. At the same time, the course will investigate how queer theory has been put to use in literary study, musicology and art history.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Daub, A. (PI)
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