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1 - 10 of 207 results for: all courses

ANTHRO 6: Human Origins (ANTHRO 206, HUMBIO 6)

The human fossil record from the first non-human primates in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene, 80-65 million years ago, to the anatomically modern people in the late Pleistocene, between 100,000 to 50,000 B.C.E. Emphasis is on broad evolutionary trends and the natural selective forces behind them.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 14: Introduction to Anthropological Genetics

For upper division undergraduates. The extent and pattern of variation among human genomes, the origin of these patterns in human evolution, and the social and medical impact of recent discoveries. Topics include: the Human Genome Project; human origins; ancient DNA; genetic, behavioral, linguistic, cultural, and racial diversity; the role of disease in shaping genetic diversity; DNA forensics; genes and reproductive technology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 171: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 271, HUMBIO 145L)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 175: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 1: Human Evolution and Environment

Human genetic and cultural evolution and how people interact with their environments, from the ancestors of Australopithecus to current events. Issues include race, gender, and intelligence; pesticide and antibiotic resistance; abortion and contraception; ecosystem services; environmental economics and ethics; the evolution of religion; climate change; population growth and overconsumption; origins and spread of ideas and technologies; and the distribution of political and economic power.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 3N: Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gilly, W. (PI)

BIO 4N: Peopleomics: The science and ethics of personalized genomic medicine

Exploration of the new field of personalized genomic medicine. Personalized medicine is based on the idea that each person's unique genome sequence can be used to predict risk of acquiring specific diseases, and to make more informed medical choices. The science behind these approaches; where they are heading in the future; and the ethical implications such technology presents. Lectures augmented with hands-on experience in exploring and analyzing a real person's genome.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 7S: Introduction to Biology

The major fields of biology: biochemistry, the cell, evolution, and diversity. Foundation for higher-level biology courses.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 9S: Introduction to Biological Research Methods

Theory and practice of experimental biology. Introduction to how to plan an experiment, conduct, and analyze data. Introduction to scientific writing and reading scientific journal articles. Prerequisite: high school biology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 11N: Biotechnology in Everyday Life

Preference to freshmen. The science that makes transgenic plants and animals possible. Current and future applications of biotechnology and the ethical issues raised.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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