Daryl Cameron, PhD

Daryl Cameron, PhD

Visiting Assistant Professor, CCARE
Assistant Professor of Social Psychology, University of Iowa

Daryl Cameron earned his B.A. in Psychology and Philosophy from the College of William and Mary in 2006, and received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from UNC Chapel Hill in 2013. Daryl is an Assistant Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Iowa. Daryl has two primary lines of research. First, he focuses on the causes and consequences of compassion. He has shown how our tendency to feel more compassion for one victim than many victims is driven by fear of compassion and emotion regulation. He has also examined how regulating compassion can create its own costs by changing moral identity and moral principles. His other line of research explores the affective dynamics of moral judgment. He has shown how emotional awareness can enable more informed moral decisions, and how automatic and controlled emotional processes interact to shape moral judgments and decisions to help others. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation.

Firdaus Dhabhar, PhD

Firdaus Dhabhar, PhD

Collaborating Scientist
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University

Firdaus Dhabhar is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. His transdisciplinary research program is supported by membership in the Immunology Institute, Neuroscience Institute, and Cancer Institute at the Stanford School of Medicine. He graduated summa cum laude from Dartmouth College with a double major in Biology and Political Science, and received a Ph.D. in Biomedical Science from The Rockefeller University under the mentorship of Professors Bruce McEwen (stress neuroendocrinology) and Ralph Steinman (immunology). Dr. Dhabhar’s laboratory has elucidated mechanisms by which short-term stressors enhance immunity, while long-term stressors suppress/dysregulate immune function. He has proposed that the fight-or-flight stress response is nature’s fundamental but underappreciated survival mechanism which could be harnessed clinically to promote health and healing. Dr. Dhabhar believes that activities/interventions (e.g. compassion training, meditation, exercise, art) that reduce “bad” stress are likely to increase the efficacy of protective “good” stress. Through rewarding collaborations with colleagues at Stanford (Spiegel, Bouley, Gross, O’Hara, Kesler, Hallmayer), UCSF (Epel, Blackburn, Wolkowitz), Yale (Ickovics, Jokl, Rosenberger), and UC Davis (Saron), his laboratory investigates bidirectional interactions between the brain and immune system in the context of stress, depression, skin immunity, surgery, and cancer. Dr. Dhabhar has served on committees at the National Academies of Science, and in elected and appointed positions for the PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society. Among Dr. Dhabhar’s honors are the Council of Graduate Schools Distinguished Dissertation Award (for outstanding dissertation selected internationally); the PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society Young Investigator Award (for outstanding contributions in basic and clinical research); and the Richter Award (for excellence in the field of Psychoneuroendocrinology).

Yotam Heineberg, PsyD

Yotam Heineberg, PsyD

Collaborating Scientist
Clinical Supervisor, Palo Alto University

Dr. Heineberg is a clinical supervisor for therapists in training and lecturer for Palo Alto University, as well as Applied Psychological Interventions Associate at CCARE. His work is informed by his training in Compassion Focused Therapy and evidence based principles to explore new routes towards healing via compassion practices. Dr. Heineberg’s passion has been finding effective methods for healing the cycle of violence with compassion. With collaborators Drs. Rony Berger and Philip Zimbardo, he has been implementing “ERASE-Stress-Pro-Social”, a school-based, teacher mediated program that reduces post traumatic distress and increases pro social engagement in warzones and inner cities. They have recently completed data collection on an international project to examine the processes of heroic transformation from violence to peacemaker among former gang members, and Israeli and Palestinian former combatants who now work to make peace in their communities. These pilots will inform future compassion trainings in school systems worldwide. Dr. Heineberg is also passionate about scalable technology based interventions to increase wellbeing and compassion. He recently developed VBT (Values and Behavior Tracking), a web based program that emphasizes a healing integration of positive values with kind behaviors. He also works with his collaborator Dr. Dan Martin in order to develop additional technology tools to increase wellbeing and pro-sociality in a variety of settings, ranging from clinical populations, to school systems and workplace environments. Dr. Heineberg earned his undergraduate degree in psychology and comparative literature at Tel Aviv University. He completed his doctorate in clinical psychology at the PGSP-Stanford consortium focusing on the cycle of violence, trauma and aggression, and applied scalable interventions to increase psychological wellbeing, and compassion for self and others. He recently completed his post-doctoral fellowship with CCARE, where he has focused his energy on developing compassion interventions, as well as leading the Stanford Compassion In Action student volunteer initiative in East Palo Alto.

Brian Knutson, PhD

Brian Knutson, PhD

Collaborating Scientist
Associate Professor of Psychology, Stanford University

Brian Knutson is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Stanford University, and a CHP/PCOR associate. His research focuses on the neural basis of emotional experience and expression. He investigates this topic with a number of methods including self-report, measurement of nonverbal behavior, comparative ethology, psychopharmacology, and functional brain imaging. His long-term goal is to understand the neurochemical and neuroanatomical mechanisms responsible for emotional experience and to explore the implications of these findings for the assessment and treatment of clinical disorders of affect and addiction, as well as economic behavior. Knutson has received Young Investigator Awards from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, the Association for Behavioral Medicine Research, the American Psychiatric Association, and the New York Academy of Science. He received BA degrees in experimental psychology and comparative religion from Trinity University, a PhD in experimental psychology from Stanford, and has conducted postdoctoral research in affective neuroscience at UC-San Francisco and at the National Institutes of Health.

Daniel Martin, PhD

Daniel Martin, PhD

Collaborating Scientist
Associate Professor of Management, California State University - East Bay

Daniel E. Martin is an Associate Professor of Management at California State University, East Bay. Formerly a Visiting Associate Professor at CCARE, Stanford University, a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law & Society at UC Berkeley, a Research Fellow for the U.S. Army Research Institute as well as a Personnel Research Psychologist for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, he has worked with private, public and nonprofit organizations on pre-employment selection, training, and organizational assessment. His research interests include: social capital, ethical behavior, racism and prejudice, human resources assessment, religiosity, spirituality and humor.

Dan is published in a range of journals including Personnel Review, Human Organization, Ethics and Behavior, and the Journal of Applied Psychology. His current research streams investigate the impact of individual differences and ideology on social corporate responsibility and human resources decision making. Other streams involve the impact of ideology on compassion and psychological well-being. His current applied work on the use of untapped social capital to ameliorate social problems serve as a research, skills development and assessment platform. Dan holds a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Howard University.

Monica Worline, Ph.D.

Monica Worline, Ph.D.

Collaborating Scientist
Organizational psychologist and President of Vervago, Inc.
Monica Worline, Ph.D., is an organizational psychologist and President of Vervago, Inc., a company dedicated to research and teaching that supports organizations to make the most of their intellectual capital through effective development of courageous thinking, compassionate leadership, and crafting an environment that brings people alive in their work. Monica is an award-winning teacher and an interdisciplinary scholar who has served on the faculty of Goizueta Business School at Emory University and on the faculties of the Paul Merage School of Business at the University of California Irvine and the UC Irvine School of Social Ecology. Monica’s writing has been featured in publications such as the Harvard Business Review, the Chicago Tribune, and BizEd Magazine and her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as Administrative Science Quarterly and Organization Science. Monica is a founding member of the CompassionLab, a research collaborative promoting rigorous, multi-faceted inquiry into the expression of compassion in organizations and its impacts. Monica completed her doctoral work in organizational psychology at the University of Michigan and is a member of the Positive Organizational Scholarship community housed in the Ross School of Business. She earned her B.A. with distinction and honors at Stanford University, where her emphasis on humanities continues to provide a strong foundation for her unique blend of critical thinking and creativity.
Jamil Zaki, PhD

Jamil Zaki, PhD

Collaborating Scientist
Assistant Professor of Psychology, Stanford University

Jamil Zaki is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.  His research examines the neural bases of social cognition and behavior: how people come to understand each other, and decide to behave towards each other.  This work spans a number of domains, including empathy, theory of mind, social influence, and prosocial behavior.  Dr. Zaki received his BA in cognitive neuroscience from Boston University and his PhD in psychology from Columbia University, and conducted postdoctoral research on altruism and prosocial behavior at the Harvard Center for Brain Science.  He has received research and teaching awards from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, the Society for Neuroscience, the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, Autism Speaks, and Harvard University.

  

Romi Chiorean

Romi Chiorean

Videographer

Romi Chiorean shares his time between art studio practice and filmmaking. He has studied fine art and photography since his youth and entered the field of filmmaking over ten years ago. Romi studied Ceramics and Painting at the Academy of Art and Design in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, Art Restoration and Computer Graphics at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City and Cinematography at the American Film Institute Conservatory in Los Angeles. Romi has a long standing interest in the subconscious mind and representation of mental activity that cannot always be expressed in words but is commonplace in visual art and music. Besides his work for CCARE, Romi provides video services for a number of Silicon Valley companies such as Cloudera, LucidWorks, Mirantis and a number of startups.

Christopher Wesselman

Christopher Wesselman

Volunteer Photographer

Chris’ diverse background includes degrees in Finance & Slavic Languages from the University of Pennsylvania and professional experience in international banking and investor relations. He has been a small business owner, an entrepreneur/consultant, and has worked in high tech with Apple & Stanford. Chris has been a formal student of Zen Buddhism since 1997, and hopes to complete his lay ordination (Jukai) in 2013. He would like to broaden his lifelong interest in compassion and mindfulness, and how to successfully apply these transformational concepts in everyday life.

Chris’ interest in photography dates back to his first cameras, a Kodak Brownie and a hand-me-down Leica from his mother. He has had a keen interest in documentary and travel photography, though his recent focus has been on non-profit organizations working for positive change. These volunteering efforts have included CCARE, the Gyuto Vajrayana Center, the Vajrapani Institute, TeachAIDS, Zen Heart Sangha, and his alma mater Dunn School (where he serves on the Board of Trustees). He is also a pro bono photographer for Stanford’s Ho Center for Buddhist Studies, as well as the School of Education where he has provided technology & computer support for the last 10 years.