Introduction to Physical Oceanography (CEE 262D, EARTHSYS 164, ESS 148)

Code: 
164

The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).

Subject: 
CEE
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Energy in the Southwest (CEE 16SC, POLISCI 25SC)

Code: 
11SC
The technical, social, and political issues surrounding energy management and use in the West, using California, Nevada, and Arizona as a field laboratory. Students explore energy narratives, such as: Who supplies our energy and from what sources? How is it transported? Who distributes to users and how do they do it? Water for energy and energy for water, two intertwined natural resources. Meeting carbon emission goals by 2020. Conflicts between desert ecosystems and renewable energy development. Emphasis on renewable energy sources and the water-energy nexus.
Subject: 
ENERGY
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Hydrodynamics

Code: 
262A
The flow of incompressible viscous fluid; emphasis is on developing an understanding of fluid dynamics that can be applied to environmental flows. Topics: kinematics of fluid flow; equations of mass and momentum conservation (including density variations); some exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations; appropriate analysis of fluid flows including Stokes flows, potential flows, and laminar boundary layers; and an introduction to the effects of rotation and stratification through scaling analysis of fluid flows.
Subject: 
CEE
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Energy in the Southwest (CEE 16SC, ENERGY 11SC)

Code: 
25SC
The technical, social, and political issues surrounding energy management and use in the West, using California, Nevada, and Arizona as a field laboratory. Students explore energy narratives, such as: Who supplies our energy and from what sources? How is it transported? Who distributes to users and how do they do it? Water for energy and energy for water, two intertwined natural resources. Meeting carbon emission goals by 2020. Conflicts between desert ecosystems and renewable energy development. Emphasis on renewable energy sources and the water-energy nexus.
Subject: 
POLISCI
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

The Energy-Water Nexus (GEOPHYS 80)

Code: 
140
General Education Requirement(s): 
WAY-AQR
Energy, water, and food are our most vital resources constituting a tightly intertwined network: energy production requires water, transporting and treating water needs energy, producing food requires both energy and water. The course is an introduction to learn specifically about the links between energy and water. Students will look first at the use of water for energy production, then at the role of energy in water projects, and finally at the challenge in figuring out how to keep this relationship as sustainable as possible.
Subject: 
EARTHSYS
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Sustainable Water Resources Development

Code: 
265A
Alternative criteria for judging the sustainability of projects. Application of criteria to evaluate sustainability of water resources projects in several countries. Case studies illustrate the role of political, social, economic, and environmental factors in decision making. Influence of international aid agencies and NGOs on water projects. Evaluation of benefit-cost analysis and environmental impact assessment as techniques for enhancing the sustainability of future projects. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental and Water Studies, or consent of instructor.
Subject: 
CEE
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Wastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery

Code: 
174B
This course builds upon CEE 174A, covering basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to treat wastewater. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved.
Subject: 
CEE
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

Code: 
174A
This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved.
Subject: 
CEE
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s):