Kimberly Moekle

Type: 
Energy Faculty
Affiliated Faculty

Environmental rhetoric and environmental ethics, with a particular focus on sustainable energy.

Photo: 

Nuclear Cultures

Code: 
187
This course examines the new cultural forms that arose out of the use of nuclear technology. Subjects covered will include: The Manhattan Project, nuclear activism, nuclear experimentation in medicine, pre-nuclear history, nuclear energy, and nuclear waste and trade.
Subject: 
ANTHRO
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Sustainability and Collapse

Code: 
8
General Education Requirement(s): 
THINK, WAY-A-II
What does it mean to live sustainably? How do our different definitions of nature ¿ scientific, literary, cultural, and historical ¿ shape the way we answer that question? nnSustainability and Collapse will explore what people in different places and periods of time have envisioned as successful ways of living with nature and how such ways of life have come under pressure. We will focus particularly on the interface between scientific and humanistic approaches to questions of environmental sustainability through a study of novels, historical texts, and works of biogeography.
Subject: 
THINK
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, ETHICSOC 278M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M)

Code: 
134L
General Education Requirement(s): 
GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER
How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories.
Subject: 
POLISCI
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Politics of Energy Efficiency

Code: 
19N
General Education Requirement(s): 
WAY-SI
We will examine the political context of energy efficiency and climate change. Why are some countries, such as Japan and France, able to achieve high levels of energy efficiency, while others, such as the United States and Australia, struggle to do so? What political factors faciliate or impede energy efficiency policies? Why is international cooperation on climate change so difficult?
Subject: 
POLISCI
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Decision Analysis Applications: Business Strategy and Public Policy

Code: 
453
What are the most essential, efficient, and effective ways that important decisions are being made in the real world? Experienced practitioners provide insights from technically challenging and organizationally complex decisions that they helped analyze for decision makers in businesses, nonprofits, and governments. Both the process and content of such decisions are discussed. Process includes disciplined qualitative and quantitative approaches for framing, structuring, modeling, assessing, evaluating, appraising, and communicating decisions.
Subject: 
MSE
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

Code: 
278M
How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories.
Subject: 
ETHICSOC
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 278M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

Code: 
178M
General Education Requirement(s): 
GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER
How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories.
Subject: 
ETHICSOC
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s):