Aeronautics and Astronautics

Manu Prakash: "You Suddenly Stumble Upon Completely New and Creative Solutions"

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Type: 
Research News

Stanford bioengineers explore the inner workings of a novel mode of insect flight.

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Bioengineers explore inner workings of insect flight
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How does this beetle move along water?

How does this beetle move along water?

When Manu Prakash was a graduate student, he would often search for his thoughts during hikes through the woods in western Massachusetts. On one of these excursions, he stopped by a pond to watch water lilies blossom, and noticed a series of small ripples flash across the water.

Last modified Wed, 9 Mar, 2016 at 8:57

What Matters to Me & Why - Sidney and Persis Drell

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Wednesday, May 4, 2016.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor  Map

Open to all

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2016. 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: 
Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor
Contact Info: 
dianea1@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free, open to all

Last modified Wed, 2 Mar, 2016 at 14:44

Next-Generation Wind Energy - John Dabiri

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Opportunities and Challenges for Next-Generation Wind Energy

4:30 - 6 pm

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center  Map

 

Date/Time: 
Tuesday, April 26, 2016. 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Location: 
Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center

Last modified Mon, 22 Feb, 2016 at 9:28

Machine-learning makes poverty mapping as easy as night and day

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Research News

An artificial intelligence system trains itself to identify poverty zones by comparing daytime and nighttime satellite images in a novel way.

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Machine-learning makes poverty mapping as easy as night and day
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An artificial intelligence system trains itself to identify poverty zones by comparing daytime and nighttime satellite images in a novel way.

Children of mine employees in Uganda

Researchers are developing software that can analyze satellite imagery to provide a better way to map poverty in places like Uganda. REUTERS | James Akena

Last modified Tue, 1 Mar, 2016 at 10:39

Women's Seminar, Anousheh Ansari of Prodea Systems & space explorer

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The ME Graduate Women's Group has offered ME/ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives, a 1-unit credit seminar, every year since the group's inception in 1998. For credit or not, everyone is welcome to come! Speakers are asked to address the factors, experiences, and lessons that have been particularly important to their success in industry, academia, and... life. 

Learn To Lead, Lead to Learn

4:15pm Social | 4:30pm Seminar starts

Date/Time: 
Thursday, February 18, 2016. 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Sandia National Laboratories, General Motors, AT&T, Lockheed Martin, the Vice Provost of Engineering Education, and the School of Engineering Alumni Relations Progra
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Fri, 12 Feb, 2016 at 9:15

Meet "Hedgehog": Your tour guide to asteroids, comets and other things that whirl around the solar system

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Type: 
Research News

A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

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Robotic hedgehog will hop, flip, explore
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Engineers build cube-like rover for extreme conditions in space

Your best guess is that the landscape is as inhospitable as it gets: an irregular range of sharp boulders and loose rubble piles strewn among jagged crevasses and deep troughs of dust. But then again, it’s just a guess because no one’s ever actually seen this landscape up close. Now imagine that you need to send a robot across that landscape, from a perch at the lip of a steep crater to the edge of an ice-encrusted hole 1,000 meters away. And imagine that gravity is a tiny fraction of what we have on Earth.

Last modified Thu, 18 Feb, 2016 at 9:27

Stanford team develops software to predict and prevent drone collisions

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Type: 
Research News

How do we prevent collisions when thousands of drones are flying in congested areas? A software-enabled system could play the role of an autonomous air traffic manager for unmanned flights.

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Software could predict and prevent drone collisions
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Software-enabled system could predict and prevent drone collisions

Stanford engineers are developing software to predict and prevent collisions of unmanned aircraft, including delivery drones, in congested urban airspace.

When Jeff Bezos unveiled his vision of drones delivering packages to Amazon customers during a 60 Minutes segment in late 2013, it caught many people as science fiction. Scarcely two years later, drones are poised to become a technology for not just delivering packages, but monitoring agriculture, gathering news in urban environments and even conducting search and rescue missions.

Last modified Fri, 11 Dec, 2015 at 13:39

Plasma experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth

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Type: 
Research Profile

New laboratory technique allows researchers to replicate on a tiny scale the swirling clouds of ionized gases that power the sun, to further our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares and other cosmic phenomena.

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Experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth
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Plasma research furthers our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares

Intense heat, like that found in the sun, can strip gas atoms of their electrons, creating a swirling mass of positively and negatively charged ions known as a plasma.

For several decades, laboratory researchers sought to replicate plasma conditions similar to those found in the sun in order to help them understand the basic physics of ionized matter and, ultimately, harness and control fusion energy on Earth or use it as a means of space propulsion.

Last modified Thu, 3 Dec, 2015 at 9:23