Materials Science and Engineering

Zhenan Bao: On a Quest to Develop Artificial Skin

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Type: 
Research News

A team of engineers works on a material that can flex like skin, transmit sensory data to the brain and restore a sense of touch.

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Zhenan Bao: On a Quest to Develop Artificial Skin
Short Dek: 
A team of engineers works on a material that can flex like skin, transmit sensory data to the brain and restore a sense of touch.

 

Stanford chemical engineering Professor Zhenan Bao has spent a decade trying to develop materials that can flex and heal like skin, and also serve as the sensor net sending touch, temperature and pain signals to the brain. In a scientific journal, Bao’s team recently demonstrated a first — a skin-like material that could detect pressure and transmit signals to nerve cells. In this video, Bao shares how her team’s research could improve our ability to monitor health and potentially add a sense of touch to prosthetic limbs.

Last modified Wed, 9 Mar, 2016 at 14:02

What Matters to Me & Why - Sidney and Persis Drell

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Wednesday, May 4, 2016.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor  Map

Open to all

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2016. 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: 
Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor
Contact Info: 
dianea1@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free, open to all

Last modified Wed, 2 Mar, 2016 at 14:44

Pioneering Stanford computer researcher and educator Edward McCluskey dies

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Type: 
Research News

The professor emeritus who paved the way for everything from complex chips to crash-proof computers, and who trained 75 PhDs, also loved quirky hats and nature.

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Pioneering Stanford computer researcher and educator Edward McCluskey dies
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The professor emeritus who paved the way for everything from complex chips to crash-proof computers, and who trained 75 PhDs, also loved quirky hats and nature.

Edward J. McCluskey, a professor emeritus at Stanford whose research helped pave the way for electronics and computing, died on Feb. 13. He was 86.

Born on the eve of the Great Depression, McCluskey graduated from Bowdoin College in Maine in 1953, earning honors in mathematics and physics, then went on to study electrical engineering at MIT, where he earned his doctorate in 1956.

Last modified Thu, 25 Feb, 2016 at 11:42

Can large-scale solar power storage become a reality?

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Type: 
Research News

An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce, store and consume energy.

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Can large-scale solar power storage become a reality?
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An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce, store and consume energy.

The solar energy of the past? REUTERS/Stringer

The recent crash in oil prices notwithstanding, an economy based on fossil fuels seems unsustainable. Supplies of oil, coal and similar fuels are finite, and even if new sources are found, global warming must be considered. Limitless solar power remains the Holy Grail, but among other obstacles to widespread adoption, society needs ways to store solar energy and deliver power when the sun isn't shining.

Last modified Fri, 26 Feb, 2016 at 14:50

Women's Seminar, Ann Majewicz, University of Texas

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The ME Graduate Women's Group has offered ME/ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives, a 1-unit credit seminar, every year since the group's inception in 1998. For credit or not, everyone is welcome to come! Speakers are asked to address the factors, experiences, and lessons that have been particularly important to their success in industry, academia, and... life. 

Learn To Lead, Lead to Learn

4:15pm Social | 4:30pm Seminar starts

Date/Time: 
Friday, March 11, 2016. 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Sandia National Laboratories, General Motors, AT&T, Lockheed Martin, the Vice Provost of Engineering Education, and the School of Engineering Alumni Relations Progra
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Mon, 22 Feb, 2016 at 16:00

A Conversation with Mark Fields, Ford President and CEO

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Introduction by Professor Sheri Sheppard

Burton J. and Deedee McMurtry University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

1:30 – 2:30 pm
Thursday, February 25, 2016
d.School Atrium  Map
Limited capacity

 

Date/Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2016. 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Location: 
d.school, Stanford
Sponsors: 
Center for Automotive Research, The REVS Program at Stanford
Admission: 
Limited capacity

Last modified Fri, 19 Feb, 2016 at 16:05

MEET THE MAKERS Winter 2016 Student Showcase

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9:30 am
Wednesday, March 16, 2016
The Atrium, Peterson Building 550, Stanford  Map

 

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, March 16, 2016. 9:30 am - 11:30 am
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Thu, 11 Feb, 2016 at 15:33

Open Garage Talk - Mindset of a Champion

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Reception at 5 pm, discussion at 6 pm
Wednesday, February 10
 Automotive Innovation Facility, Stanford  Map
     

Registration required; seating is limited

 

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, February 10, 2016. 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Location: 
Automotive Innovation Facility, Stanford
Admission: 
Free with registration, open to the public

Last modified Fri, 5 Feb, 2016 at 16:30

Meet "Hedgehog": Your tour guide to asteroids, comets and other things that whirl around the solar system

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Type: 
Research News

A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

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Robotic hedgehog will hop, flip, explore
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Engineers build cube-like rover for extreme conditions in space

Your best guess is that the landscape is as inhospitable as it gets: an irregular range of sharp boulders and loose rubble piles strewn among jagged crevasses and deep troughs of dust. But then again, it’s just a guess because no one’s ever actually seen this landscape up close. Now imagine that you need to send a robot across that landscape, from a perch at the lip of a steep crater to the edge of an ice-encrusted hole 1,000 meters away. And imagine that gravity is a tiny fraction of what we have on Earth.

Last modified Thu, 18 Feb, 2016 at 9:27