Energy Resources Engineering

What Matters to Me & Why - Sidney and Persis Drell

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Wednesday, May 4, 2016.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor  Map

Open to all

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2016. 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: 
Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor
Contact Info: 
dianea1@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free, open to all

Last modified Wed, 2 Mar, 2016 at 14:44

Can large-scale solar power storage become a reality?

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Type: 
Research News

An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce, store and consume energy.

Slug: 
Can large-scale solar power storage become a reality?
Short Dek: 
An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce, store and consume energy.

The solar energy of the past? REUTERS/Stringer

The recent crash in oil prices notwithstanding, an economy based on fossil fuels seems unsustainable. Supplies of oil, coal and similar fuels are finite, and even if new sources are found, global warming must be considered. Limitless solar power remains the Holy Grail, but among other obstacles to widespread adoption, society needs ways to store solar energy and deliver power when the sun isn't shining.

Last modified Fri, 26 Feb, 2016 at 14:50

Next-Generation Wind Energy - John Dabiri

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Opportunities and Challenges for Next-Generation Wind Energy

4:30 - 6 pm

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center  Map

 

Date/Time: 
Tuesday, April 26, 2016. 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Location: 
Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center

Last modified Mon, 22 Feb, 2016 at 9:28

Water-Energy Nexus with New Materials Technology - Yi Cui

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Precourt Institute for Energy, Seminar Series

04:30 PM - 05:20 pm, Monday, February 29, 2016

Nvidia Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center

Free and Open to All

 

Date/Time: 
Monday, February 29, 2016. 4:30 pm - 6:20 pm
Location: 
Nvidia Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Mon, 11 Jan, 2016 at 17:04

Plasma experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth

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Type: 
Research Profile

New laboratory technique allows researchers to replicate on a tiny scale the swirling clouds of ionized gases that power the sun, to further our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares and other cosmic phenomena.

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Experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth
Short Dek: 
Plasma research furthers our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares

Intense heat, like that found in the sun, can strip gas atoms of their electrons, creating a swirling mass of positively and negatively charged ions known as a plasma.

For several decades, laboratory researchers sought to replicate plasma conditions similar to those found in the sun in order to help them understand the basic physics of ionized matter and, ultimately, harness and control fusion energy on Earth or use it as a means of space propulsion.

Last modified Thu, 3 Dec, 2015 at 9:23

Atom-sized craters make a catalyst much more active

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Type: 
Research News

SLAC, Stanford Engineering discovery could speed important chemical reactions, such as making hydrogen fuel

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Discovery speeds chemical reactions
Short Dek: 
SLAC, Stanford discovery could speed important chemical reactions

Bombarding and stretching an important industrial catalyst opens up tiny holes on its surface where atoms can attach and react, greatly increasing its activity as a promoter of chemical reactions, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Last modified Thu, 3 Dec, 2015 at 9:16

Stanford researcher suggests storing solar energy underground for a cloudy day

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Type: 
Research News

A common criticism of a total transition to wind, water and solar power is that the U.S. electrical grid can't affordably store enough standby electricity to keep the system stable. Stanford researcher Mark Z. Jacobson proposes an underground solution to that problem.

Slug: 
Solar energy for a cloudy day
Short Dek: 
Stanford researcher proposes underground storage for solar energy

A new study shows that wind, water and solar generators can theoretically result in a reliable, affordable national grid when the generators are combined with inexpensive storage.

Last modified Mon, 30 Nov, 2015 at 10:28

Computational Approaches to Sustainable Energy

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4:30 pm - 6 pm

Date/Time: 
Tuesday, January 12, 2016. 4:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Location: 
Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fischer Conference Room, Stanford
Admission: 
Free, Registration Required

Last modified Mon, 23 Nov, 2015 at 14:01