Engineering Physics

What Matters to Me & Why - Sidney and Persis Drell

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Wednesday, May 4, 2016.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor  Map

Open to all

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2016. 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: 
Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor
Contact Info: 
dianea1@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free, open to all

Last modified Wed, 2 Mar, 2016 at 14:44

A group of scholars look to early 20th century radio technology to help improve Internet security

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Type: 
Research News

A new study shows how harnessing the quantum properties of light can create a transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping.

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Scholars look to radio for Internet security
Short Dek: 
Properties of light can create transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping

Imagine communicating with your bank, the IRS or your doctor by way of an Internet that was perfectly secure. Your most private data would be protected with absolute certainty and, better yet, if any bad actor were to try to eavesdrop you would know immediately. Such is the promise of secure quantum communication. 

Last modified Thu, 18 Feb, 2016 at 9:31

New Stanford research reveals the secrets of stishovites, a rare form of crystallized sand

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Type: 
Research News

Lasers are nothing like meteor strikes, but in the nanosecond when each strike silicon dioxide, the main ingredient in coastal sand, stishovites form. Understanding how this rare crystal form will help improve laser technology and allow Earth scientists to better understand meteor impacts.

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Understanding stishovite crystals will help improve laser technology
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Understanding how stishovite crystals form will help improve laser technology

An asteroid smashing into the earth and a laser pulsing through optical glass are very different phenomena, but both produce the extreme heat and pressures that instantaneously fuse silicon dioxide – the compound found in sand and glass -- into the hard, dense and rare crystal known as stishovite.

Named after Sergey M. Stishov, the Russian physicist who first synthesized it in 1961, stishovite means different things to different scientists.

To geologists, stishovite provides residual proof of a meteor impact.

Last modified Thu, 10 Dec, 2015 at 16:25

Stanford engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution

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Type: 
Research News

A new tool enables researchers to test millions of mutated proteins in a matter of hours or days, speeding the search for new medicines, industrial enzymes and biosensors.

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Researchers invent process to accelerate protein evolution
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Stanford engineers can test millions of protein variants in a matter of hours

All living things require proteins, members of a vast family of molecules that nature "makes to order" according to the blueprints in DNA.

Through the natural process of evolution, DNA mutations generate new or more effective proteins. Humans have found so many alternative uses for these molecules – as foods, industrial enzymes, anti-cancer drugs – that scientists are eager to better understand how to engineer protein variants designed for specific uses.

Last modified Thu, 10 Dec, 2015 at 16:25

Plasma experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth

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Type: 
Research Profile

New laboratory technique allows researchers to replicate on a tiny scale the swirling clouds of ionized gases that power the sun, to further our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares and other cosmic phenomena.

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Experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth
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Plasma research furthers our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares

Intense heat, like that found in the sun, can strip gas atoms of their electrons, creating a swirling mass of positively and negatively charged ions known as a plasma.

For several decades, laboratory researchers sought to replicate plasma conditions similar to those found in the sun in order to help them understand the basic physics of ionized matter and, ultimately, harness and control fusion energy on Earth or use it as a means of space propulsion.

Last modified Thu, 3 Dec, 2015 at 9:23

Cosmic Clue: The Dark Matter Mystery

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Tuesday, Nov.17, 2015 at 7:30 PM
Panofsky Auditorium
Science and User Support Building (BLDG 53)

 

Date/Time: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2015. 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Location: 
SLAC, Panofsky Auditorium

Last modified Mon, 2 Nov, 2015 at 13:22

A high-resolution endoscope as thin as a human hair

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Type: 
Research News

Engineers at Stanford have developed a prototype single-fiber endoscope that improves the resolution of these much-sought-after instruments fourfold over existing designs. The advance could lead to an era of needle-thin, minimally invasive endoscopes able to view features out of reach of today’s instruments.

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A Hair-thin Endoscope
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New single-fiber endoscope improves resolution fourfold over existing designs.

Engineers at Stanford have demonstrated a high-resolution endoscope that is as thin as a human hair with a resolution four times better than previous devices of similar design. The so-called micro-endoscope is a significant step forward in high-resolution, minimally invasive bio-imaging with potential applications in research and clinical practice.  Micro-endoscopy could enable new methods in diverse fields ranging from study of the brain to early cancer detection.

Last modified Thu, 28 Mar, 2013 at 12:12