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61 - 70 of 93 results for: PHYSICS

PHYSICS 231: Graduate Quantum Mechanics II

Basis for higher level courses on atomic solid state and particle physics. Problems related to measurement theory and introduction to quantum computing. Approximation methods for time-independent and time-dependent perturbations. Semiclassical and quantum theory of radiation, second quantization of radiation and matter fields. Systems of identical particles and many electron atoms and molecules. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 230.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayden, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 234: Advanced Topics in Quantum Mechanics (PHYSICS 134)

Scattering theory, partial wave expansion, Born approximation. Additional topics may include nature of quantum measurement, EPR paradox, Bell's inequality, and topics in quantum information science; path integrals and applications; Berry's phase; structure of multi-electron atoms (Hartree-Fock); relativistic quantum mechanics (Dirac equation). Undergraduates register for PHYSICS 134 (4 units). Graduate students register for PHYSICS 234 (3 units). Prerequisite: PHYSICS 131.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayden, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 240: Introduction to the Physics of Energy

Energy as a consumable. Forms and interconvertability. World Joule budget. Equivalents in rivers, oil pipelines and nuclear weapons. Quantum mechanics of fire, batteries and fuel cells. Hydrocarbon and hydrogen synthesis. Fundamental limits to mechanical, electrical and magnetic strengths of materials. Flywheels, capacitors and high pressure tanks. Principles of AC and DC power transmission. Impossibility of pure electricity storage. Surge and peaking. Solar constant. Photovoltaic and thermal solar conversion. Physical limits on agriculture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Laughlin, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 241: Introduction to Nuclear Energy

Radioactivity. Elementary nuclear processes. Energetics of fission and fusion. Cross-sections and resonances. Fissionable and fertile isotopes. Neutron budgets. Light water, heavy water and graphite reactors. World nuclear energy production. World reserves of uranium and thorium. Plutonium, reprocessing and proliferation. Half lives of fission decay products and actinides made by neutron capture. Nuclear waste. Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. Molten sodium breeders. Generation-IV reactors. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion. Laser compression. Fast neutron production and fission-fusion hybrids. Prerequisities: Strong undergraduate background in elementary chemistry and physics. PHYSICS 240 and PHYSICS 252 recommended but not required. Interested undergraduates encouraged to enroll, with permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Laughlin, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 252: Introduction to Particle Physics I (PHYSICS 152)

Elementary particles and the fundamental forces. Quarks and leptons. The mediators of the electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. Interaction of particles with matter; particle acceleration, and detection techniques. Symmetries and conservation laws. Bound states. Decay rates. Cross sections. Feynman diagrams. Introduction to Feynman integrals. The Dirac equation. Feynman rules for quantum electrodynamics and for chromodynamics. Undergraduates register for PHYSICS 152. Graduate students register for PHYSICS 252. (Graduate students will be required to complete additional assignments in a format determined by the instructor.) Prerequisite: PHYSICS 130. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 131.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Peskin, M. (PI)

PHYSICS 260: Introduction to Stellar and Galactic Astrophysics (PHYSICS 160)

Observed characteristics of stars and the Milky Way galaxy. Physical processes in stars and matter under extreme conditions. Structure and evolution of stars from birth to death. White dwarfs, planetary nebulae, supernovae, neutron stars, pulsars, binary stars, x-ray stars, and black holes. Galactic structure, interstellar medium, molecular clouds, HI and HII regions, star formation, and element abundances. Undergraduates register for PHYSICS 160. Graduate students register for PHYSICS 260. (Graduate students will be required to complete additional assignments in a format determined by the instructor.) Prerequisite: PHYSICS 121.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 261: Introduction to Cosmology and Extragalactic Astrophysics (PHYSICS 161)

What do we know about the physical origins, content, and evolution of the Universe -- and how do we know it? Students learn how cosmological distances and times, and the geometry and expansion of space, are described and measured. Composition of the Universe. Origin of matter and the elements. Observational evidence for dark matter and dark energy. Thermal history of the Universe, from inflation to the present. Emergence of large-scale structure from quantum perturbations in the early Universe. Astrophysical tools used to learn about the Universe. Big open questions in cosmology. Undergraduates register for Physics 161. Graduates register for Physics 261. (Graduate students will be required to complete additional assignments in a format determined by the instructor.) Prerequisite: PHYSICS 121 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Roodman, A. (PI)

PHYSICS 262: General Relativity

Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is a basis for modern ideas of fundamental physics, including string theory, as well as for studies of cosmology and astrophysics. The course begins with an overview of special relativity, and the description of gravity as arising from curved space. From Riemannian geometry and the geodesic equations, to curvature, the energy-momentum tensor, and the Einstein field equations. Applications of General Relativity: topics may include experimental tests of General Relativity and the weak-field limit, black holes (Schwarzschild, charged Reissner-Nordstrom, and rotating Kerr black holes), gravitational waves (including detection methods), and an introduction to cosmology (including cosmic microwave background radiation, dark energy, and experimental probes). Prerequisite: PHYSICS 121 or equivalent including special relativity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 290: Research Activities at Stanford

Required of first-year Physics graduate students; suggested for junior or senior Physics majors for 1 unit. Review of research activities in the department and elsewhere at Stanford at a level suitable for entering graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PHYSICS 291: Practical Training

Opportunity for practical training in industrial labs. Arranged by student with the research adviser's approval. A brief summary of activities is required, approved by the research adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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