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11 - 20 of 48 results for: BIO ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIO 105B: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (EARTHSYS 105B)

Formerly 96B - Jasper Ridge Docent Training. First of two-quarter sequence training program to join the Jasper Ridge education/docent program. The scientific basis of ecological research in the context of a field station, hands-on field research, field ecology and the natural history of plants and animals, species interactions, archaeology, geology, hydrology, land management, multidisciplinary environmental education; and research projects, as well as management challenges of the preserve presented by faculty, local experts, and staff. Participants lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education classes available to members of the JRBP community after the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 107: Human Physiology Laboratory (HUMBIO 136)

This laboratory course is active and inquiry based. Aspects of exercise and temperature are explored; however, the specific questions the class tackles differ each quarter. Samples of past questions: Does lactic acid accumulation correlate with exercise fatigue at different exercise and body temperatures? Does palm cooling during exercise mitigate the effect of body temperature on fatigue with or without evaporative cooling? Students participate both as experimenters and as subjects of the experiments in two-person teams. Participants must be in good physical condition, though not necessarily athletes, and must be willing to participate in strenuous exercise routines under adverse environmental conditions. Varsity athletes concurrently participating in a spring sport must consult the instructor before applying. Discussion sessions include student presentations of journal articles, data analyses, and feedback on individual WIM research proposals. By application only, see sites.stanford.edu/bio107humbio136 for the application form. Prerequisite: Bio 42 or HumBio 4A. Satisfies WIM for Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 108: Essential Statistics for Human Biology (HUMBIO 85A)

Introduction to statistical concepts and methods that are essential to the study of questions in biology, environment, health and related areas. The course will teach and use the computer language R and Python (you learn both, choose one). Topics include distributions, probabilities, likelihood, linear models; illustrations will be based on recent research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIOC 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 118: Genetic Analysis of Biological Processes

Focus is on using mutations and genetic analysis to study biological and medical questions. The first portion of the course covers how the identification and analysis of mutations can be used in model systems to investigate biological processes such as development and metabolism. In the second portion of the course, we focus on the use of existing genetic variation in humans and other species to identify disease-associated genes as well as to investigate variation in morphological traits such as body size and shape.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Simon, M. (PI)

BIO 124: Topics in Cancer Biology

This discussion-based course will explore the scientific tools used to study the molecular and genetic basis of cancer and to develop treatments for this disease. Topics covered may include cancer models, traditional and targeted cancer therapies, and the development of resistance to treatment. Students will develop skills in critical reading of primary research articles and will also complete a final project. Prerequisites: Biology/Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Imam, J. (PI)

BIO 129B: Cellular Dynamics II: Building a Cell

Principles of cell organization; how common biochemical pathways are modified to generate diversity in cell structure and function. Roles of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in cellular architecture. Mechanisms of protein sorting and trafficking, and protein modules and switches in regulating cell polarity. Yeast to polarized epithelial cells and neurons. Emphasis is on experimental logic, methods, problem solving, and interpretation of results. Students present research papers. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2. Prerequisite: Biology core. Recommended: 129A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nelson, W. (PI)

BIO 132: Advanced Imaging Lab in Biophysics (APPPHYS 232, BIO 232, BIOPHYS 232, GENE 232)

Laboratory and lectures. Advanced microscopy and imaging, emphasizing hands-on experience with state-of-the-art techniques. Students construct and operate working apparatus. Topics include microscope optics, Koehler illumination, contrast-generating mechanisms (bright/dark field, fluorescence, phase contrast, differential interference contrast), and resolution limits. Laboratory topics vary by year, but include single-molecule fluorescence, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, microendoscopy, and optical trapping. Limited enrollment. Recommended: basic physics, Biology core or equivalent, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIO 137: Plant Genetics

Gene analysis, mutagenesis, transposable elements; developmental genetics of flowering and embryo development; biochemical genetics of plant metabolism; scientific and societal lessons from transgenic plants. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Walbot, V. (PI)

BIO 138: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 238)

This advanced course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins, and then its recent development in natural (especially ecological), economic, psychological, and other social sciences. We will use the ecosystem services framework (characterizing benefits from ecosystems to people) to define the state of knowledge, core methods of analysis, and research frontiers, such as at the interface with biodiversity, resilience, human health, and human development. Intended for diverse students, with a focus on research and real-world cases. To apply, please email the instructor (gdaily@stanford.edu) with a brief description of your background and research interests.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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