2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

61 - 70 of 177 results for: BIO

BIO 128: Geographic Impacts of Global Change: Mapping the Stories (EARTHSYS 129)

Forces of global change (eg., climate disruption, biodiversity loss, disease) impart wide-ranging political, socioeconomic, and ecological impacts, creating an urgent need for science communication. Students will collect data for a region of the US using sources ranging from academic journals to popular media and create an interactive Story Map ( http://stanford.maps.arcgis.com/apps/StorytellingTextLegend/index.html?appid=dafe2393fd2e4acc8b0a4e6e71d0b6d5) that merges the scientific and human dimensions of global change. Students will interview stakeholders as part of a community-engaged learning experience and present the Map to national policy-makers. Our 2014 Map is being used by the CA Office of Planning & Research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 129A: Cellular Dynamics I: Cell Motility and Adhesion

Cell motility emphasizing role of actin assembly and dynamics coupling actin organization to cell movement. Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix, and remodelling of extracellular matrix in development and disease. Directed cell migration by chemotaxis (neuronal path-finding, immune cells). Cell-cell adhesion, formation of intercellular junctions and mechanisms regulating cell-cell interactions in development and diseases. Emphasis is on experimental logic, methods, problem solving, and interpretation of results. Students present research papers. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2. Prerequisite: Biology core.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 129B: Cellular Dynamics II: Building a Cell

Principles of cell organization; how common biochemical pathways are modified to generate diversity in cell structure and function. Roles of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in cellular architecture. Mechanisms of protein sorting and trafficking, and protein modules and switches in regulating cell polarity. Yeast to polarized epithelial cells and neurons. Emphasis is on experimental logic, methods, problem solving, and interpretation of results. Students present research papers. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2. Prerequisite: Biology core. Recommended: 129A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 131: Complex Systems Lab

Applications of complex systems will be explored in thisnseminar through lectures, discussions, and a class project. Lecture topicsninclude a discussion of chaos in weather modeling and aircraft turbulence,napplication of network science to understand Ebola and the ALS ice bucketnchallenge, and self-organized processes such as crowd dynamics andnWikipedia. The first half of the course will emphasize complex systemsnapplications. Students will apply complex systems analysis techniques tontheir personal research, a current event, or repeat a classic complexnsystems experiment. Projects can include topics such as calculating thenfractal dimension of a forest, simulating crowd dynamics, studying thendegree distribution of social networks, or making a Van der Pol oscillator.nGraduate student led seminar. Can be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 132: Advanced Imaging Lab in Biophysics (APPPHYS 232, BIO 232, BIOPHYS 232, GENE 232)

Laboratory and lectures. Advanced microscopy and imaging, emphasizing hands-on experience with state-of-the-art techniques. Students construct and operate working apparatus. Topics include microscope optics, Koehler illumination, contrast-generating mechanisms (bright/dark field, fluorescence, phase contrast, differential interference contrast), and resolution limits. Laboratory topics vary by year, but include single-molecule fluorescence, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, microendoscopy, and optical trapping. Limited enrollment. Recommended: basic physics, Biology core or equivalent, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIO 136: Evolutionary Paleobiology

A paleontological approach to evolutionary theory. Topics: history of life, speciation, heterochrony, evolutionary constraint, coevolution, macroevolution, the Cambrian Explosion, mass extinctions, taphonomy, life on land, life in the sea, life in the air. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4. Prerequisite: Biology Core.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 137: Plant Genetics

Gene analysis, mutagenesis, transposable elements; developmental genetics of flowering and embryo development; biochemical genetics of plant metabolism; scientific and societal lessons from transgenic plants. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 138: Ecosystem Services: The Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 238)

This advanced course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins, and then its recent development in natural (especially ecological), economic, psychological, and other social sciences. We will use the ecosystem services framework (characterizing benefits from ecosystems to people) to define the state of knowledge, core methods of analysis, and research frontiers, such as at the interface with biodiversity, resilience, human health, and human development. Intended for diverse students, with a focus on research and real-world cases. Class size is limited to 12. To apply, please email the instructor (gdaily@stanford.edu) with a brief description of your background and research interests.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 139: Biology of Birds

How birds interact with their environments and each other, emphasizing studies that had impact in the fields of population biology, community ecology, and evolution. Local bird communities. Emphasis is on field research. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisites: 43 or equivalent, and consent of instructor. Recommended: birding experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 141: Biostatistics (STATS 141)

Introductory statistical methods for biological data: describing data (numerical and graphical summaries); introduction to probability; and statistical inference (hypothesis tests and confidence intervals). Intermediate statistical methods: comparing groups (analysis of variance); analyzing associations (linear and logistic regression); and methods for categorical data (contingency tables and odds ratio). Course content integrated with statistical computing in R.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints