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21 - 30 of 38 results for: COMM ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMM 277A: Computational Journalism (COMM 177A)

Focuses on using data and algorithms to lower the cost of discovering stories or telling stories in more engaging and personalized ways. Project based assignments based on real-world challenges faced in newsrooms. Prior experience in journalism or computational thinking helpful. Prerequisite: Comm 273D, COMM 113/213, or the consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nguyen, D. (PI)

COMM 277I: Becoming a Watchdog: Investigative Reporting Techniques (COMM 177I)

Graduate students register for COMM 277I.) Learn how to apply an investigative and data mindset to journalism, from understanding how to background an individual or entity using online databases to compiling or combining disparate sets of information in ways that unveil wrongdoing or mismanagement. Focuses on mining texts, tracking associations, and using visualizations. Stories produced apply investigative techniques to beat reporting, breaking news, and long form journalism. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 289P: Journalism Thesis

MA thesis course. Focuses on development of in-depth journalism project, culminating in work of publishable quality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 290: Media Studies M.A. Project

Individual research for coterminal Media Studies students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 299: Individual Work

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 301: Communication Research, Curriculum Development and Pedagogy

Designed to prepare students for teaching and research in the Department of Communication. Students will be trained in developing curriculum and in pedagogical practices, and will also be exposed to the research programs of various faculty members in the department. Required of all Ph.D. students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 308: Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology (POLISCI 324)

For students interested in research in political science, psychology, or communication. Methodological techniques for studying political attitudes and behaviors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 324: Language and Technology

In this course we develop a model of how language reflects social and psychological dynamics in social media and other technologically-mediated contexts. The course lays out the main stages of analyzing language to understand social dynamics, including using theory to identify key discourse features, feature extraction, and classification and prediction. The course will draw on action-oriented language approaches to understand how people use language (e.g., grounding and joint action models), and then build on this approach to understand how discourse features from natural language can be used to answer questions from a wide range of social science questions, and ultimately, to the design of new technologies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hancock, J. (PI)

COMM 325G: Comparative Studies of News and Journalism

Focus is on topics such as the roles and responsibilities of journalists, news as a genre of popular literature, the nexus between press and state, and journalism's commitment to political participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Glasser, T. (PI)

COMM 335: Deliberative Democracy and its Critics (AMSTUD 135, COMM 135, COMM 235, POLISCI 234P, POLISCI 334P)

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fishkin, J. (PI)
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