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1 - 10 of 126 results for: COMM

COMM 1A: Media Technologies, People, and Society (COMM 211)

(Graduate students register for COMM 211.) Open to non-majors. Introduction to the concepts and contexts of communication. A topics-structured orientation emphasizing the field and the scholarly endeavors represented in the department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 1B: Media, Culture, and Society (AMSTUD 1B)

The institutions and practices of mass media, including television, film, radio, and digital media, and their role in shaping culture and social life. The media's shifting relationships to politics, commerce, and identity.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 100S: Self-Representation in Digital Media

Digital media allows ordinary people to document, publicize and reinvent themselves in ways previously only available to the elite. In the first half of this course, we will examine how Westerners have represented themselves as individuals. We will focus on photography, as indicative of a shift in prevalence of self-representation to the masses. In the second half of the course, we will examine how the ways in which individuals are represented may affect their understanding of themselves. Students will experiment with self-representation in different media, including creating virtual representations (avatars) of themselves to be inhabited in immersive virtual reality in the Virtual Human Interaction Lab. In the process, they will learn how the shared digital world shadows, interprets and sometimes overwrites the physical world and day-to day life.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Won, A. (PI)

COMM 102S: Political Communication and Social Media

This course will explore how social media and mobile computing platforms affect the modern political landscape. Topics: how these technologies change the mix of news, information and campaign materials we get; structure our relationships with candidates and representatives; augment modern politicians' fundraising and campaign efforts; and make possible new forms of political organization and collective action. Possible case studies: the Obama campaign's successful use of social/mobile technology to campaign in 2008 and 2012; how constituents use social media to communicate with their representatives; and the role of social-mobile technologies in modern revolutionary movements.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 103S: Media Entertainment

The impact of media entertainment on individuals, social groups, and societies. Sources include a diverse cross-section of entertainment. Introduction to psychological and socio-psychological theories. Empirical findings relating to media entertainment as a stimulus and a reception phenomenon. What renders diverse genres of media content and format enjoyable? Why do individuals pursue entertainment experiences in ever-increasing numbers? What is the political impact of apolitical media entertainment?
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bosshart, L. (PI)

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to sophomores and juniors.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 106: Communication Research Methods (COMM 206)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 106S: Communication Research Methods

An introduction to social science research methods for those who have little or no prior experience in statistics. Designed to provide students with a critical framework and a set of tools to examine social problems - especially those related to the area of communication and the media. Students will be guided through the process of formulating real-world research questions, parsing them into analyzable statements, engaging in systematic data collection and analysis, and finally, thinking about value and limits of its outcome. Hands-on research experience provided.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 107S: Engendering Compassion with Interactive Digital Media

This course will draw on research regarding behavioral, cognitive, and physiological indicators and predictors of compassion, as well as computer-mediated communication, intimate and ubiquitous computing, social networking, and multitasking to better understand how interactive digital media affects compassionate behaviors, including altruism and helping. For their final project, students will either (1) propose an experiment for future research investigating compassion in HCI, or (2) propose a design change for an extant technology to engender compassionate responses.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 108: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 208)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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