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121 - 130 of 180 results for: all courses

GEOPHYS 190: Near-Surface Geophysics

Introduction to the integration of geophysical field measurements and laboratory measurements for imaging and characterizing the top 100 meters of Earth. Examples will focus on applications related to water resource management. The link between the measured geophysical properties of rocks, soils, and sediments, and their material properties. Forward modeling and inversion of geophysical data sets. Each week includes two hours of lectures; plus one two-hour lab that involves acquisition of field or lab data, or computer modeling/analysis of data. Pre-requisite: CME 100 or Math 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 183: Programming and Algorithms for Natural Language Processing

Construction of computer programs for linguistic processes such as string search, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis and generation, and simple machine translation. Emphasis is on the algorithms that have proved most useful for solving such problems.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 114: Introduction to Scientific Computing (CME 108)

Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).nGraduate students should take it for 3 units and undergraduate students should take it for 4 units.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. How scientists and engineers are designing new materials for surgeon to use in replacing body parts such as heart tissue or the spinal cord. How cells, in the body and transplanted stem cells, communicate with implanted materials. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 151: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties (MATSCI 251)

Primarily for students without a materials background. Mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructure in a range of engineering materials. Elementary deformation and fracture concepts, strengthening and toughening strategies in metals and ceramics. Topics: dislocation theory, mechanisms of hardening and toughening, fracture, fatigue, and high-temperature creep. Prerequisite: MATSCI 163. Undergraduates register in 151 for 4 units; graduates register for 251 in 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 152: Electronic Materials Engineering

Materials science and engineering for electronic device applications. Kinetic molecular theory and thermally activated processes; band structure; electrical conductivity of metals and semiconductors; intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors; elementary p-n junction theory; operating principles of light emitting diodes, solar cells, thermoelectric coolers, and transistors. Semiconductor processing including crystal growth, ion implantation, thin film deposition, etching, lithography, and nanomaterials synthesis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dionne, J. (PI)

MATSCI 153: Nanostructure and Characterization

The structure of materials at the nanoscale is in most cases the same crystalline form as the natural phase. Structures of materials such as semiconductors, ceramics, metals, and nanotubes; classification of these materials according to the principles of crystallography. Primary methods of structural characterization, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy; their applications to study such nanostructures.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sher, R. (PI)

MATSCI 154: Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies

Understand the thermodynamics and efficiency limits of modern green technologies such as carbon dioxide capture from air, fuel cells, batteries, and solar-thermal power.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chueh, W. (PI)

MATSCI 155: Nanomaterials Synthesis

The science of synthesis of nanometer scale materials. Examples including solution phase synthesis of nanoparticles, the vapor-liquid-solid approach to growing nanowires, formation of mesoporous materials from block-copolymer solutions, and formation of photonic crystals. Relationship of the synthesis phenomena to the materials science driving forces and kinetic mechanisms. Materials science concepts including capillarity, Gibbs free energy, phase diagrams, and driving forces.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Clemens, B. (PI)

MATSCI 156: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution (EE 293A, ENERGY 293A, MATSCI 256)

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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