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291 - 300 of 387 results for: all courses

MUSIC 187: Music and Culture from the Land of Fire: Introduction to Azerbaijani Mugham

Nestled in the Caucasus, Azerbaijan is a crossroads between East and West; its rich musical heritage contains threads of Turkish, Central Asian, Persian, Caucasian, Russian, and Arabic traditions. In this course, master-musician Imamyar Hasanov teaches students to perform and appreciate Azeri music. Content includes classical mugham, Eastern theory, improvisation and microtonality. We¿ll discuss Azeri music culture, supplemented by guest lecturers and Skype¿ interviews with musicians in Azerbaijan. Open to students with any experience playing a musical instrument (including voice). No previous experience with Azeri music necessary. Supported by the SF World Music Festival.Questions? Email schultza@stanford.edu.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 103S: Native American Women, Gender Roles, and Status (CSRE 103S)

Historical and cultural forces at work in traditional and contemporary Native American women's lives through life stories and literature. How women are fashioning gendered indigenous selves. Focus is on the diversity of Native American communities and cultures.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course surveys Native American history from the time of the earliest records to current social and political issues. We will explore Native perspectives on United States histories through readings, images, films, and other sources. Our primary focus will be on tribal experiences -- examined through the words, music, and visual expressions of Native American people -- of origins and migrations, colonialism, resistance, adaptation, survival, self-determination, and transformation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Aldern, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.)Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPAUSTL 40: Australian Studies

Introduction to Australian society, history, culture, politics, and identity. Social and cultural framework and working understanding of Australia in relationship to the focus on coastal environment in other program courses. Field trips.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPBEIJ 7: Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China

How sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Interdisciplinary approach to how gender and sexuality have emerged as a privileged modality of modern identity and an important site of social and political struggles in 20th-century China and beyond. Topics include: cross-dressing, marriage resistance, free love, women¿s mobilization in revolution and war, state feminism, postsocialist celebrations of the body, and the emergent queer movement. Readings range from feminist theory to historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, short story, play, essay, and film. Prior coursework in Chinese history or literature is recommended but not necessary. In English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, H. (PI)

OSPBEIJ 67: China-Africa and Middle East Relations

China¿s relations with the outside world, with a focus on Africa and the Middle East. Historically contextualized relations; evolution of relations within the international climate during different periods, especially in the present; impact of geopolitical and geoeconomic relations on the existing international order.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPBER 13: Jewish and Muslim Berlin

Politics of religion and religious minorities in contemporary German/ Berlin culture, with a focus on Jews and Muslims. Consideration of political, historical, social and cultural perspectives: differences between American and German separation of religion and political structures; the historical establishment of Jewish culture in comparison to the contemporary rise of Islam to second-largest religious community in Germany; antisemitism and Islamophobia in Germany and Europe; recent religious controversies (mosques, circumcision, the veil, etc.) Material: Literature, site visits in Berlin, meetings with representatives of the Jewish and Muslim communities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPBER 174: Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective

Theory and history of mass spectator sports and their role in modern societies. Comparisons with U.S., Britain, and France; the peculiarities of sports in German culture. Body and competition cultures, with emphasis on the entry of women into sports, the modification of body ideals, and the formation and negotiation of gender identities in and through sports. The relationship between sports and politics, including the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPCPTWN 15: Segregation and Social Distance: The Politics of Social Separation

Compare and contrast apartheid practices of ¿separate development¿ with policies of reservation and ghettoization used in other countries and in different historical periods. Case studies range from Blacks and American Indians in the United States, to the Jews and Roma in Europe, and the Burakumin in Japan. Key question include: Which groups (or what characteristics) were targeted for policies of segregation? Do these vary over time and across countries? What role does ¿race¿ play in justifying these practices, and how do the policies, in turn, help to reproduce ideas about race and racial difference?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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