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1 - 10 of 24 results for: AFRICAAM ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AFRICAAM 18B: Jazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present (MUSIC 18B)

Modern jazz styles from Bebop to the current scene. Emphasis is on the significant artists of each style.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berry, F. (PI)

AFRICAAM 21: African American Vernacular English (LINGUIST 65)

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin' and rappin'), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact (DANCE 45)

By learning various dance improvisation forms across cultures, students will develop techniques to gain a deep understanding of generating movement from the inside-out, inspired by conceptual strategies from master improvisors while harnessing that potential for creating dances. Guest dancer/choreographer workshops and Dance Jams enhance the learning experience. All Levels welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 54N: African American Women's Lives (AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, FEMGEN 54N, HISTORY 54N)

Preference to freshmen. The everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America in comparative context of histories of European, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Primary sources including personal journals, memoirs, music, literature, and film, and historical texts. Topics include slavery and emancipation, labor and leisure, consumer culture, social activism, changing gender roles, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 112: Urban Education (CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 115: South African Encounters (AFRICAST 115)

This course is a prerequisite for all those accepted to or on the wait list for the following quarter's BOSP Cape Town term abroad. It will explore issues in contemporary South Africa.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

AFRICAAM 133: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, political and literary aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry, though we will also read some theoretical texts, as well as excerpts of Francophone theater. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary forms, terms and practices. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French (in addition to reading comprehension) both in and outside of class. Required readings include: Aimé Césaire, "Cahier d'un retour au pays natal," Albert Memmi, "La Statue de Sel," Kaouther Adimi, "L'envers des autres", Maryse Condé, "La Vie sans fards". Movies include "Goodbye Morocco", "Aya de Yopougon", "Rome plutôt sue Vous". Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (HISTORY 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Roberts, R. (PI)

AFRICAAM 148: The African Atlantic (AFRICAST 145B, COMPLIT 145B, COMPLIT 345B, CSRE 145B, FRENCH 145B, FRENCH 345B)

This course explores the central place Africa holds in prose writing emerging during early and modern periods of globalization across the Atlantic, including the middle passage, exploration and colonialism, black internationalism, decolonization, immigration, and diasporic return. We will begin with Equiano's Interesting Narrative (1789), a touchstone for the Atlantic prose tradition, and study how writers crossing the Atlantic have continued to depict Africa in later centuries: to dramatize scenes of departure and arrival in stories of self-making or new citizenship, to evoke histories of racial unity or examine psychic and social fragmentation, to imagine new national communities or question their norms and borders. Our readings will be selected from English, French, Portuguese and Spanish-language traditions. And we will pay close attention to genres of prose fiction (Conrad, Condé, Olinto), epic and prose poetry (Césaire, Walcott), theoretical reflection (Gilroy, Glissant, Mudimbe, Benitez-Rojo), and literary autobiography (Barack Obama, Saidiya Hartman).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ikoku, A. (PI)
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