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1 - 10 of 19 results for: ARCHLGY ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ARCHLGY 1: Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology (ANTHRO 3)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 21Q: Eight Great Archaeological Sites in Europe (CLASSICS 21Q)

(Formerly CLASSART 21Q.) Preference to sophomores. Focus is on excavation, features and finds, arguments over interpretation, and the place of each site in understanding the archaeological history of Europe. Goal is to introduce the latest archaeological and anthropological thought, and raise key questions about ancient society. The archaeological perspective foregrounds interdisciplinary study: geophysics articulated with art history, source criticism with analytic modeling, statistics interpretation. A web site with resources about each site, including plans, photographs, video, and publications, is the basis for exploring.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 97: Archaeology Internship

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, museums or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Prior instructor consent needed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 117B: Monuments and Landscapes: An Archaeological Perspective (ANTHRO 117B, ANTHRO 217B)

The landscape is a result of the action and interaction of human and natural factors. Communities have altered their landscapes for a variety of reasons, including the subsistence practices; as a consequence of economic growth; to express a social ideology, and as a consequence of political and religious drivers. Accordingly, landscapes enable physical and provide psychological sustenance to people, and the human need to relate to our surroundings is part of the way in which identities are created and disputed. Within the humanities, landscape is being conceptualized as a process, a practice and as performance, and monuments within a given landscape have an equally important role, not to mention history. They are often the most durable and well-known evidence of the ancient civilizations, and should be observed jointly with the landscape. How did the landscape predefine the monument and how did the monument complement, emphasize or devalue the landscape? What philosophy channeled the construction of the monuments within the landscapes? Whether ephemeral or permanent, the human agency left traces in the landscape; thus, both monuments and landscapes are the key indicators for understanding the ideology of a particular culture. Archaeology, through its interdisciplinary nature, provides a unique perspective, as well as tools, for examining the formation processes of all man-made elements, within both natural and cultural landscapes. nnThe course will address the multifaceted issues of the ways that people have consciously and unconsciously shaped the land around them through time. It will look into diverse, geographically and periodically influenced concepts of a monument and landscape. The course will be divided into two parts, with the first one covering the theory and methodological approaches and the second part the conceptual characteristics, modifications and changeability in various archaeological and historical periods and cultural frameworks.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Caval, S. (PI)

ARCHLGY 118: Engineering the Roman Empire (CLASSICS 168)

(Formerly CLASSART 117.) Enter the mind, the drafting room, and the building site of the Roman architects and engineers whose monumental projects impressed ancient and modern spectators alike. This class explores the interrelated aesthetics and mechanics of construction that led to one of the most extensive building programs undertaken by a pre-modern state. Through case studies ranging from columns, domes and obelisks to road networks, machines and landscape modification, we investigate the materials, methods, and knowledge behind Roman innovation, and the role of designed space in communicating imperial identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 125: ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SURVEY METHODS

Practicum applying a variety of survey techniques to discover, map, and record archaeological sites. Basic cartographic skills for archaeologists and an introduction to GIS tools, GPS instruments, and geophysical techniques. Participants should be able to walk 3 - 4 miles over uneven terrain or make special arrangements with the instructor for transportation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jones, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 141: Heritage and The State: Nationalism, Indigeneity, and Neoliberalism (ARCHLGY 241)

Heritage has been popularly connected with the romantic nation. And many debates about the use of the past in the present have used this vocabulary of modernist nationalism. Today, however, we live in an age where neoliberalism and transnationalism is challenging well-known modes of national sovereignty and citizenship. This course will investigate the changing nature of statecraft in the globalized 21st century. Spotlighting the state¿s specific application and reinvention of technologies such as cultural policy, heritage management and historiography.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Plets, G. (PI)

ARCHLGY 151: Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (CLASSICS 151)

(Formerly CLASSART 113/213.) Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 165: Roman Gladiators (CLASSICS 164)

In modern America, gladiators are powerful representatives of ancient Rome (Spartacus, Gladiator). In the Roman world, gladiators were mostly slaves and reviled, barred from certain positions in society and doomed to short and dangerous lives. A first goal of this course is to analyze Roman society not from the top down, from the perspective of politicians, generals and the literary elite, but from the bottom up, from the perspective of gladiators and the ordinary people in the stands. A second goal is to learn how work with very different kinds of evidence: bone injuries, ancient weapons, gladiator burials, laws, graffiti written by gladiators or their fans, visual images of gladiatorial combats, and the intricate architecture and social control of the amphitheater. A final goal is to think critically about modern ideas of Roman ¿bloodthirst.¿ Are these ideas justified, given the ancient evidence?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Trimble, J. (PI)
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