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1 - 10 of 48 results for: BIO ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIO 2N: Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease in a Changing World

This seminar will explore the ways in which anthropogenic change, climate change, habitat destruction, land use change, and species invasions effects the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases. Topics will include infectious diseases of humans, wildlife, livestock, and crops, effects of disease on threatened species, disease spillover, emerging diseases, and the role of disease in natural systems. Course will be taught through a combination of popular and scientific readings, discussion, and lecture. .
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mordecai, E. (PI)

BIO 3N: Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gilly, W. (PI)

BIO 7N: Introduction to Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 16: Conservation Storytelling: Pre-course for BOSP South Africa

Limited to students admitted to the BOSP South Africa overseas seminar. Through 4 workshop meetings, students will develop and pitch story ideas, form teams in which a writer and a photographer agree to collaborate on a story, and conduct background research prior to departing for South Africa.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 25Q: The Molecular Basis of Genetic Disease

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on two genetic diseases resulting from the production of protein molecules that are unable to fold into their native conformations, called conformational diseases: cystic fibrosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Lou Gehrig's disease. Hypotheses and controversies surrounding the molecular basis of these disorders, and implications for novel therapeutics. Readings from research literature.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 28Q: Hacking the Genetic Code

How do scientists use the tools of molecular biology to engineer microorganisms, plants, and animals to advance knowledge and improve human health? In this Sophomore Seminar, we will explore the molecular details of genome manipulation tools; the biological, medical, and environmental applications of these tools; and the ethical implications of genetic engineering. Throughout the quarter, you will have an opportunity to analyze journal articles, talk with genome engineering experts, design experiments, engage in debates, and develop an original research proposal.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Tennen, R. (PI)

BIO 30: Ecology for Everyone (EARTHSYS 30)

Everything is connected, but how? Ecology is the science of interactions and the changes they generate. This project-based course links individual behavior, population growth, species interactions, and ecosystem function. Introduction to measurement, observation, experimental design and hypothesis testing in field projects, mostly done in groups. The goal is to learn to think analytically about everyday ecological processes involving bacteria, fungi, plants, animals and humans. The course uses basic statistics to analyze data; there are no math prerequisites except arithmetic. Open to everyone, including those who may be headed for more advanced courses in ecology and environmental science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gordon, D. (PI)

BIO 43: Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology

Principles of evolution: macro- and microevolution and population genetics. Ecology: the principles underlying the exchanges of mass and energy between organisms and their environments; population, community, and ecosystem ecology; populations, evolution, and global change. Equivalent to BIOHOPK 43. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X (or 31A,B), 33. Recommended: BIO 41, 42; CHEM 35; MATH 19, 20, 21 or 41, 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 43A: Bio Solve-It

Students enrolled in Bio43 lecture and regular discussion sections attend two additional 80 min sections per week. The objective of the course is to help students to solidify basic concepts, identify areas to work on, and apply core concepts learned that week in Bio43 lecture and section. Space is limited, by application only. Co-Requisite: Bio 43.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 44Y: Core Plant Biology & Eco Evo Laboratory

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of how to conduct biological research, using a topic in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Plant Biology as a practical example. This includes the complete scientific process: assessing background literature, generating testable hypotheses, learning techniques for field- and lab-based data collection, analyzing data using appropriate statistical methods, and finally writing and sharing results. To build these skills, this course will focus on the ecology of oak regeneration at Stanford's nearby Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. Students, working in teams, will develop novel research hypotheses and execute the necessary experiments and measurements to test these hypotheses. The capstone of the course will be an oral defense of students' findings, as well as a research paper in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Labs will be completed both on campus and at Jasper Ridge. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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