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1 - 10 of 38 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CSRE 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 13: Digital Humanities and African American History Black History in the Age of the Digital Database (URBANST 103)

The focus of this workshop is on the social and cultural histories and present conditions relating to social movements and the role of leaders and heroes in urban settings. The workshop seeks to foster historical consciousness of past struggles for justice through collective action as well as to introduce students to a diverse range of leaders of contemporary social justice movements. Additionally, as an underpinning concept, the course explores the changing meaning and importance of social and cultural heroes through history, literature, and music. Workshop activities will divided between sessions with guest speakers and classes held to discuss background concepts and material.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 16A: Dynamic Australia: immigrant and indigenous experiences

How did modern Australian society take shape? Within this larger framework, several subsidiary questions will guide us: What have been the experiences of immigrants, of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, and how have their relations evolved over time? To what degree has Australia been formed by successive waves of immigration? What has been the fate of the Aboriginal peoples? How have intergroup relations evolved since the start of colonialism in the late 18th century? What have been the elements of racial formation, and how have they changed over time? What does it mean to be Australian in the 21st century? How might the creative arts (e.g. music, literature, drama, painting, dance) help us understand Australian identities and intergroup dynamics? nnAs a course project, students are required to informally interview someone whose life history has involved large-scale displacement, voluntary or otherwise. This is intended as a means of sharpening awareness of migration as a feature of modern world history as articulated at the level of individuals and communities.nThis course is primarily intended for students enrolled in or waitlisted for the BOSP Summer Seminar in Sydney (June-July 2016). However, all participants will find it a wide-ranging introduction to Australian society and a case study in intergroup dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 31SI: Food + Race

If we are what we eat, Food + Race is a class that explores what we eat and how we talk about it. In this student-initiated course, we will look at popular culture and discourse as a gateway to issues like just labour practices and equitable access, cultural authenticity, family histories of im/migration, appropriation and consumerism, and global colonial domination. From The Great British Bake Off to Korean tacos in L.A., we¿ll ask ¿What does food really mean?¿ and ¿What does food really mean to us?¿
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 32SI: Whiteness

This course provides an introduction to the concept of Whiteness. We will investigate the historical origin of "Whiteness" and "White people," examine some of the institutional and interpersonal privileges associated with Whiteness, and explore contemporary debates about White entitlement, White culture, and White charity. As we are articulating the problem of Whiteness, we will also be exploring strategies and models of "White allyship," and asking the surprisingly difficult questions of: How can White people work for racial justice, and how can people of all races work to disrupt Whiteness and White Supremacy? This class is intended for students of all majors and backgrounds interested in learning about Whiteness.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 33SI: First-Generation and/or Low-Income Experiences in American Education

Who are first-generation low-income college students, and how do they navigate educational institutions? We will attempt to answer these questions by first looking at the economic forces and educational systems that create and replicate inequality. By examining broader, societal institutions, we will develop an understanding of where ¿low-income¿ students come from, their experiences with K-12 education, and their historic exclusion from the university. Next, we will bring in both academic literature and personal experiences to define poverty, discuss the intersection of identities other than class, and understand how first-generation students function in modern American universities. Finally, we will attempt to contextualize this knowledge by reflecting on the conditions of first-generation low-income students at Stanford, and asking what the future holds for this population post-graduation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wolf, J. (PI)

CSRE 38: Deliberative Democracy Practicum: Applying Deliberative Polling (COMM 138)

In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will apply quantitative and qualitative research methods in a local community or local high school and subsequently, analyze the relevant quantitative and qualitative data. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in deliberative democracy, community and stakeholder engagement, and the practical aspects of working in local communities. This practicum is a collaboration between the Center for Deliberative Democracy, the Bill Lane Center for the American West and the Haas Center for Public Service.nnCDD website: http://cdd.stanford.edunBill Lane Center website: http://west.stanford.edunHass Center website: https://haas.stanford.edu
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Siu, A. (PI)

CSRE 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, FEMGEN 54N, HISTORY 54N)

Preference to freshmen. The everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America in comparative context of histories of European, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Primary sources including personal journals, memoirs, music, literature, and film, and historical texts. Topics include slavery and emancipation, labor and leisure, consumer culture, social activism, changing gender roles, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

CSRE 69M: Race, Science, and Medicine in U.S. History (FEMGEN 69S, HISTORY 69S)

How have scientific ideas about race been shaped by their historical contexts, and what effects do these ideas have on people, institutions, law, and medicine? Is racial science always racist science? How do ideas about race intersect with ideas about gender, class, and disability? This course explores how natural philosophers and scientists have defined, used, and sometimes challenged ideas about race from the eighteenth century to today. Topics include medicine and slavery, eugenics, sociology, psychiatry, race-based medicine, and genetic ancestry. This course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: LeBlanc, H. (PI)

CSRE 81: Race and the Law: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives (AMSTUD 108)

When Obama began his presidential tenure in 2009, many commentators declared the U.S. a truly colorblind society, a place where race (read: non-whiteness) no longer served as an impediment to individual and group aspirations, indeed had become so insignificant as to be practically invisible. In late fall 2014,in the aftermath of the police-involved killings of Eric Garner, Michael Brown, and Tamir Rice, society is confronted with a radically different social and political landscape. Yet events like these, while doubtless underscoring the fallaciousness of the equalitarian narrative, are regrettably commonplace. What, if anything, occurred during the intervening years that might explain the apparent displacement of hope by despair? With the advent of the Black Lives Matte movement, the persistence of bias and discrimination against people of color, particularly at the interface of African American males and law enforcement authorities, has attained a place of prominence on the public agenda, presenting a significant opportunity for citizen-activists, legislators, and policymakers to combine forces to effectuate meaningful change. To take advantage of this moment, it is imperative to understand the origins and development of the entrenched structural inequalities manifest in contemporary America. What role have law and legal institutions played in hindering and facilitating the promise of equality for all citizens? How far are we from realizing that vaunted democratic aspiration? This course offers participants an opportunity to systematically engage with recent events in Baltimore, Ferguson, and elsewhere in an historically informed manner that foregrounds questions of race, citizenship, and law. Against the backdrop of the achievements of the Civil Rights Movement, it considers such topics as the rise of urban ghettos and the use of segregationist practices like redlining and steering in helping to sustain them; resegregation in the late 20th-early 21st century; differential arrest and sentencing patterns; and, crucially, the extraordinary growth of the American carceral state.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cardyn, L. (PI)
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