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1 - 10 of 35 results for: BIOHOPK ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIOHOPK 43: Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology

Introduction to biology in a marine context. Principles of plant biology: physiology, structure, diversity. Principles of evolution: macro and microevolution, population genetics. Ecology: the principles governing the distribution and abundance of organisms; population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Equivalent to BIO 43. Corequisite: BIOHOPK 44Y.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 44Y: Core Laboratory in Plant Biology, Ecology and Evolution

Laboratory and field projects provide working familiarity with the concepts, organisms, and techniques of plant and evolutionary biology, and ecology. Emphasis is on hands-on experimentation in the marine environment, analysis of data, and written and oral presentation of the experiments. Equivalent to BIO 44Y. Corequisite: BIOHOPK 43. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 150H: Ecological Mechanics (BIOHOPK 250H)

(Graduate students register for 250H.) The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics. fluid mechanics, thermal dynamics, and materials science to see how the principles of these fields can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Topics include: diffusion, boundary layers, fluid-dynamic forces, locomotion, heat-budget models, fracture mechanics, adhesion, beam theory, the statistics of extremes, and the theory of self-organization. Open to students from all backgrounds. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus advantageous but not necessary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Denny, M. (PI)

BIOHOPK 155H: Developmental Biology and Evolution (BIOHOPK 255H)

(Graduate students register for 255) This course focusses on how animals form their basic body plans; from the formation of their germ layers; ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm, to how they are organized along the main developmental axes; the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. The course will focus in part on the molecular mechanisms that underlie these developmental decisions from work carried out in established developmental model species. However, we will also explore the current understanding of how these mechanisms evolved from new insights from emerging models representing a broad range of animal phyla. The setting at Hopkins Marine Station will allow us to carry out experiments from animals collected in the field, and the course will involve a substantial lab component to complement concepts and approaches presented in lecture. nPre-requisites : Biocore or by permission of instructor
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lowe, C. (PI)

BIOHOPK 161H: Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 261H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Watanabe, J. (PI)

BIOHOPK 163H: Oceanic Biology (BIOHOPK 263H)

(Graduate students register for 263H.) How the physics and chemistry of the oceanic environment affect marine plants and animals. Topics: seawater and ocean circulation, separation of light and nutrients in the two-layered ocean, oceanic food webs and trophic interactions, oceanic environments, biogeography, and global change. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Recommended: PHYSICS 21 or 51, CHEM 31, Biology core, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 167H: Nerve, Muscle, and Synapse (BIOHOPK 267H)

(Graduate students register for 267H.) Fundamental aspects of membrane excitability, nerve conduction, synaptic transmission, and excitation-contraction coupling. Emphasis is on biophysical, molecular, and cellular level analyses of these processes in vertebrate and invertebrate systems. Labs on intra- and extracellular recording and patch clamp techniques. Lectures, discussions, and labs. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors Prerequisites: PHYSICS 23, 28, 43, or equivalent; CHEM 31, 135; calculus; or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gilly, W. (PI)

BIOHOPK 168H: Disease Ecology: from parasites evolution to the socio-economic impacts of pathogens on nations (BIOHOPK 268H)

(Graduate students register for 268H.) Course will lead participants on a journey through the dynamics of infectious diseases that will start at the smallest level from within-host parasite dynamics and will progressively scale up to parasite evolution, disease ecology, public health policies, disease driven poverty traps and the socio-economic impact of infectious diseases on nations. The course will be organized around case studies, including among the others, schistosomiasis, malaria, cholera and sleeping sickness. Participants will have the opportunity to develop a capstone project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: De Leo, G. (PI)

BIOHOPK 172H: Marine Ecology: From Organisms to Ecosystems (BIOHOPK 272H)

(Graduate students register for 272H.) This course incorporates the approaches of experimental ecology, biomechanics (ecomechanics), and physiology to develop an integrated perspective on the factors that govern the structures of marine ecosystems and how environment change, including anthropogenic influences, affects ecosystems' species composition and health. Focus is on rocky intertidal, kelp forest, estuarine, and midwater ecosystems of Monterey Bay. Experimental projects done in the field offer experience in a variety of ecological techniques and in analysis of ecological data. Students will engage in presentation and debates of current topics in marine ecology and conservation. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor. Fulfills WIM in Biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Micheli, F. (PI)

BIOHOPK 173H: Marine Conservation Biology (BIOHOPK 273H)

(Graduate students register for 273H.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crowder, L. (PI)
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