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1 - 7 of 7 results for: ENGR40

EE 101A: Circuits I

Introduction to circuit modeling and analysis. Topics include creating the models of typical components in electronic circuits and simplifying non-linear models for restricted ranges of operation (small signal model); and using network theory to solve linear and non-linear circuits under static and dynamic operations. Prerequisite: ENGR40 or ENGR40M is useful but not strictly required.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 155: Green Electronics (EE 255)

Many green technologies including hybrid cars, photovoltaic energy systems, efficient power supplies, and energy-conserving control systems have at their heart intelligent, high-power electronics. This course examines this technology and uses green-tech examples to teach the engineering principles of modeling, optimization, analysis, simulation, and design. Topics include power converter topologies, periodic steady-state analysis, control, motors and drives, photovol-taic systems, and design of magnetic components. The course involves a hands-on laboratory and a substantial final project. Formerly EE 152. Required: EE101B, EE102A, EE108. Recommended: ENGR40 or EE122A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dally, B. (PI)

EE 255: Green Electronics (EE 155)

Many green technologies including hybrid cars, photovoltaic energy systems, efficient power supplies, and energy-conserving control systems have at their heart intelligent, high-power electronics. This course examines this technology and uses green-tech examples to teach the engineering principles of modeling, optimization, analysis, simulation, and design. Topics include power converter topologies, periodic steady-state analysis, control, motors and drives, photovol-taic systems, and design of magnetic components. The course involves a hands-on laboratory and a substantial final project. Formerly EE 152. Required: EE101B, EE102A, EE108. Recommended: ENGR40 or EE122A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dally, B. (PI)

ENGR 40: Introductory Electronics

Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Frequency response of linear circuits, including basic filters, using phasor analysis. Digital logic fundamentals, logic gates, and basic combinatorial logic blocks. Lab. Lab assignments. Enrollment limited to 200.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 40A: Introductory Electronics

Abbreviated version of E40, for students not pursuing degree in Electrical Engineering. Instruction to be completed in the first seven weeks of the quarter. Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Lab. Lab assignments. Enrollment limited to 200.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 40M: An Intro to Making: What is EE

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 40P: Physics of Electrical Engineering (EE 41)

How everything from electrostatics to quantum mechanics is used in common high-technology products. Electrostatics are critical in micro-mechanical systems used in many sensors and displays, and Electromagnetic waves are essential in all high-speed communication systems. How to propagate energy on transmission lines, optical fibers,and in free space. Which aspects of modern physics are needed to generate light for the operation of a DVD player or TV. Introduction to semiconductors, solid-state light bulbs, and laser pointers. Hands-on labs to connect physics to everyday experience. Prerequisites: Physics 43
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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