Environment Energy

Streamlining balky government permit processes or convoluted global supply chains are just some of the challenges in the "Valley of Death" faced by fledgling clean energy firms, government officials were told during a Stanford forum.
When oil began gushing into the Gulf of Mexico last year, scientists, engineers, and operations workers all had different ideas about what to do. The biggest lesson may have been getting these different groups to work together, Marcia McNutt of the USGS told a Stanford Graduate School of Business audience.
U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman, chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and a leading energy policymaker, met with faculty and staff involved in Stanford University's new Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, on Jan. 11, to discuss deploying technologies at commercial scale in clean energy projects.
Smaller nuclear power plants, glorified golf carts for people running errands, and fees to change commute patterns were some of the ideas generated by students as part of a Stanford interdisciplinary joint degree program to prepare students to address world environmental and sustainability issues.
By 2040 Africa will have a larger workforce than China or India, speakers told a Stanford Africa Forum 2011 conference, exploring opportunities for business development in the 50-plus nations of that continent whose business opportunities are often overlooked.
Stanford's Graduate School of Business and Law School have combined forces to push clean energy technology to deployment through a focus on policy and finance. The Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance is a new member of the University's wide-ranging energy effort.
While businesses have worked for hundreds of years to improve quality and reduce costs, the social sector has failed to make similar improvements in programs such as education or welfare, says Bill Drayton, founder and CEO of Ashoka, the world's oldest support organization for social entrepreneurs.
Stanford experts have concluded that in the event of a nuclear detonation, people in large metropolitan areas are better off sheltering-in-place in basements for 12-24 hours than trying to evacuate immediately, unless a lengthy warning period is provided.
Citing more innovative sustainable design features than any other business school in the country, the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal has named Knight Management Center winner of its 2010 Green Project of the Year, Private Award. The new home of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, scheduled for completion in spring 2011, is comprised of eight buildings around three quads.
Consumer and environmental groups, angry over the spreading oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, are calling for a boycott of BP, the oil giant that owns the well gushing oil onto beaches and marshes. According to research by Phillip Leslie and Larry Chavis, boycotts do in fact work and they're something businesses should be concerned about.

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While businesses have worked for hundreds of years to improve quality and reduce costs, the social sector has failed to make similar improvements in programs such as education or welfare, says Bill Drayton, founder and CEO of Ashoka, the world's oldest support organization for social entrepreneurs.
Citing more innovative sustainable design features than any other business school in the country, the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal has named Knight Management Center winner of its 2010 Green Project of the Year, Private Award. The new home of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, scheduled for completion in spring 2011, is comprised of eight buildings around three quads.
Today's business leaders must gird themselves for an increasingly turbulent business world, Jeff Immelt, chairman and CEO of General Electric, told MBA students. Pushing for change rarely makes you popular with investors or employees.
Ted Turner, who 30 years ago heralded the Information Age by founding CNN, has turned his focus to developing ways to stop global warming, encourage energy conservation, and stem population growth. He challenged MBA students to find solutions because "We've got to take better care of the planet."
California is quickly reaching the point where each unit of water used to raise crops costs more in ecological damage than it provides benefits of crops, said Peter Gleick, president of the Pacific Institute, during the Stanford Graduate School of Business’ annual environmental lecture.
The best entrepreneurs have a thirst for knowledge and may be willing to attempt the impossible, venture capitalist John Doerr told a student audience.
Joss, Knight, Etchemendy
Environmentally Sustainable Campus Will Be Named Knight Management Center.

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