Nonprofit

Robert J Flanagan photo
In a new book, economics Professor Robert Flanagan explains why symphony orchestras need multiple strategies to keep their finances from ballooning out of control. 
Hazelnut presentation in classroom at Rio 2.0 conference
Officials from developing countries, the U.S. State Department, and the United Nations met on campus with tech-savvy entrepreneurs to discuss how fast-spreading connection technologies can foster sustainable economic growth, improve public health, support agriculture, and protect the natural environment in many countries.
Sally Osberg photo
Social entrepreneurs, those organizations and individuals who work to improve major social issues, don't have the networks and financial systems of traditional entrepreneurs, Sally Osberg, president of the Skoll Foundation told a Stanford MBA audience. Like Ginger Rogers dancing in a 1940's musical, they face the same issues as traditional entrepreneurs, but must do it backwards in high heels.
Rupert Scofield photo
Social enterprises hold potential to "effect the kinds of changes our society needs right now," social entrepreneur Rupert Scofield told a Stanford student audience. 
Laura Arrillaga speaking at the Stanford GSB
Don't just feel good about philanthropic gifts, advises Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen in her book Giving 2.0. Put your mind to work as well as your heart.
Francis Flynn
When it comes to gift giving, most people are simply not paying enough attention to what others want says Professor Frank Flynn. They miss the boat by ignoring direct requests, wrongly assuming that going a different route will be seen as more thoughtful than something the recipient specifically requested.
In a Stanford course, Jane Chen finds her passion is saving babies
Organizations such as Goodwill Industries and the Camp Fire Girls of America have endured for more than 100 years. The key to their survival is change, not more of the same, their leaders told a business school audience.
While businesses have worked for hundreds of years to improve quality and reduce costs, the social sector has failed to make similar improvements in programs such as education or welfare, says Bill Drayton, founder and CEO of Ashoka, the world's oldest support organization for social entrepreneurs.

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Robert J Flanagan photo
In a new book, economics Professor Robert Flanagan explains why symphony orchestras need multiple strategies to keep their finances from ballooning out of control. 
Hazelnut presentation in classroom at Rio 2.0 conference
Officials from developing countries, the U.S. State Department, and the United Nations met on campus with tech-savvy entrepreneurs to discuss how fast-spreading connection technologies can foster sustainable economic growth, improve public health, support agriculture, and protect the natural environment in many countries.
Sally Osberg photo
Social entrepreneurs, those organizations and individuals who work to improve major social issues, don't have the networks and financial systems of traditional entrepreneurs, Sally Osberg, president of the Skoll Foundation told a Stanford MBA audience. Like Ginger Rogers dancing in a 1940's musical, they face the same issues as traditional entrepreneurs, but must do it backwards in high heels.
Rupert Scofield photo
Social enterprises hold potential to "effect the kinds of changes our society needs right now," social entrepreneur Rupert Scofield told a Stanford student audience. 
Laura Arrillaga speaking at the Stanford GSB
Don't just feel good about philanthropic gifts, advises Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen in her book Giving 2.0. Put your mind to work as well as your heart.
In a Stanford course, Jane Chen finds her passion is saving babies
Organizations such as Goodwill Industries and the Camp Fire Girls of America have endured for more than 100 years. The key to their survival is change, not more of the same, their leaders told a business school audience.
While businesses have worked for hundreds of years to improve quality and reduce costs, the social sector has failed to make similar improvements in programs such as education or welfare, says Bill Drayton, founder and CEO of Ashoka, the world's oldest support organization for social entrepreneurs.
More than 30 years after the darkest chapter in its history, Cambodia remains a damaged and fragile society, Youk Chhang, an expert on the Cambodian genocide and the man leading the Documentation Center of Cambodia told an audience at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

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