Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Apple’s iPhone Blunder

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Monday, February 22, 2016

Helping the government unlock the San Bernardino killer’s phone will not threaten anyone’s privacy rights. 

Featured

Safe Zones Proved Their Value After The Gulf War

by Kori Schakevia The New York Times
Monday, February 22, 2016

This is what American policy for Syria has come to: We won’t take action against the Syrian military that has made refugees of 6.5 million Syrian citizens and killed 470,000 of its own people, or against the Russian military that is targeting hospitals, and we take the long view about defeating ISIS, but we will take action to prevent Syrian refugees from fleeing that terror.

Featured

As Seen By The Saudis

by Charles Hillvia The Caravan
Monday, February 22, 2016

Perhaps no grand strategic moment has been caught by the camera in such an unposed yet meaningful way. There on the heavy cruiser USS Quincy at anchor in Egypt’s Great Bitter Lake, is President Roosevelt, fresh from Yalta, on his way back across the Atlantic, having tea with Ibn Saud Abdul-Aziz, King of Saudi Arabia. An American orderly squats before His Highness to ask how he likes his tea.

Featured

The Security Debate We Need To Have

by Amy Zegartvia Lawfare
Tuesday, February 23, 2016

The escalating war of words between Apple and the FBI is widely seen as a “security vs. privacy” dilemma. But it’s much more than that. This is also fundamentally a security vs. security dilemma. 

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Paranoid Politics

by Thomas Sowellvia Creators Syndicate
Monday, February 22, 2016

Amid all the media analyses of the prospects of each of the candidates in both political parties, there is remarkably little discussion of the validity — or lack of validity — of the arguments these candidates are using.

Analysis and Commentary

Apple’s Letters To The Public Are Slightly Disingenuous But Opposing The FBI Request Is The Right Outcome For Now

by Herbert Linvia Lawfare
Tuesday, February 23, 2016

From my perspective, the original Apple letter to its customers (“original letter”) and its answers to (frequently asked) questions (“answers document”) are slightly disingenuous in two ways.

Analysis and Commentary

Antonin Scalia, Reform Conservative

by Adam J. Whitevia The Weekly Standard
Monday, February 22, 2016

In the aftermath of Justice Scalia's untimely passing, the outpouring of remembrances describe his astonishing legal career: a Supreme Court justice, of course, and before that a D.C. Circuit judge, a University of Chicago law professor, and chief of the Ford Administration's Office of Legal Counsel.

Jeb Bush
Analysis and Commentary

Where Have All The Governors Gone? In This Election, To The Sidelines

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Monday, February 22, 2016

As circumstance would have it, I’m attending a conference in Washington, D.C. – not too far from where the National Governors Association just concluded its annual winter meeting.

Analysis and Commentary

Putin Hammers Another Nail In The Coffin Of The Russian Economy

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Forbes
Monday, February 22, 2016

As a regular visitor to the USSR and Russia in the late 1980s and 1990s, I remember the utter disaster commercial aviation was back then. Moscow’s three airports seemed deliberately designed to torture ordinary passengers, whereas the elite were escorted to their flights from exclusive lounges.

Analysis and Commentary

Brad DeLong's Distorted View Of Wealth

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, February 22, 2016

He [Thomas Piketty] saw five striking facts: First, ownership of private wealth--with its power to command resources, dictate where and how people would work, and shape politics--was always highly concentrated. This is the second sentence of Brad DeLong's "The Melting Away of North Atlantic Social Democracy."

Analysis and Commentary

Epstein On The Apple E-Books Case: The Hidden Traps In The Apple Ebook Case

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Truth on the Market
Monday, February 15, 2016

On balance the Second Circuit was right to apply the antitrust laws to Apple. Right now the Supreme Court has before it a petition for Certiorari, brought by Apple, Inc., which asks the Court to reverse the decision of the Second Circuit.

Analysis and Commentary

Greece And Taxes

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Monday, February 22, 2016

An interview for the Greek Reporter, in English, perhaps cheering the like-minded and sure to infuriate some conventional wisdom.

Interviews
Richard A. Epstein
Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Monday, February 22, 2016

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses Supreme Court decision Lochner v. New York (1905), which struck down a maximum hour law of ten hours per day and 60 hours per week.

Interviews

Kori Schake: Saving Syria At The 11th Hour

interview with Kori Schakevia Foreign Policy
Monday, February 22, 2016

Hoover Institution fellow Kori Schake discusses the reasons behind US inaction in Syria.

In the News
World Puzzle
In the News

2016: International Security Challenges & U.S.Preparedness

Tuesday, February 23, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosts "2016: International Security Challenges & U.S.Preparedness, A Look At The Year Ahead" on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm. The event video is below.

Event
In the News

Legal Scholar: Israeli Possession Of Golan Heights Is Both Legal And Sensible

quoting Peter Berkowitzvia The Tower
Monday, February 22, 2016

Israeli rule over the Golan Heights should be considered “lawful and just” and should be supported by the United States and the international community, Peter Berkowitz, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, argued in an analysis Friday for Real Clear Politics.

Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928
In the News

BBC Claims Stalin Only Killed ‘Thousands’

quoting Norman M. Naimarkvia Breitbart.com
Monday, February 22, 2016

The BBC has placed the number of people killed by the Russian Communist dictator Joseph Stalin in the “hundreds of thousands,” massively downplaying the truly horrific scale of his 30 year reign of terror. The true figure is dispute, but estimates place it in the tens of millions.

Classroom students
In the News

In The Age Of Common Core, States Are Still Defining ‘Proficient’ Differently

quoting Michael J. Petrillivia The Washington Post
Monday, February 22, 2016

The vast majority of states have adopted Common Core academic standards, but individual states are still setting different definitions of “proficient” on annual math and reading tests, according to a new study.

In the News

Common Core Creator: Subtract Parents From Math Education Equation

quoting Ze’ev Wurmanvia Heartland Institute
Monday, February 22, 2016

One of the three lead writers of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), a national initiative with roots in No Child Left Behind and other federal government education programs, recently told a Columbia University education magazine parents should avoid helping children with their math homework.

Stanford Oval
In the News

President Obama To Host Global Entrepreneurship Summit 2016 At Stanford University

mentioning Michael McFaulvia Stanford News
Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Stanford University will be a partner and will serve as the venue for the 2016 Global Entrepreneurship Summit with over 1,000 global delegates and hosted by President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and the White House announced today.

In the News

Dealmaker Jimmy Dunne: Replace Yellen As Fed Chair

mentioning Kevin Warshvia CNBC
Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Janet Yellen should be replaced as Federal Reserve chair, long-time Wall Street dealmaker Jimmy Dunne said Tuesday.

In the News

Your Favorite Episodes Of 2015

mentioning Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, February 22, 2016

I want to share with you the results of the survey of your favorite episodes of 2015. I want to thank all of you around the world (and you live in 65 different countries) who responded, particularly your general comments and feedback. Those comments were very helpful in thinking about ways to make EconTalk better.

In the News

We Know Georgia’s New State Tests Are Harder. But Are They Better?

featuring Michael J. Petrilli, Robert Pondisciovia The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Monday, February 22, 2016

A wise old African saying cautions that “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Back in 2013, Georgia policymakers made a hasty decision to go it alone on standardized testing, pulling out of the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Career (PARCC).