Latin America & Caribbean

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What Latin America Owes to the "Chicago Boys"

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 30, 1997

Economists educated at the University of Chicago have for some two decades been putting free market reforms into effect in Chile, Argentina, and other Latin American countries. One of their teachers, Nobel Prize–winner and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker, examines the results. What does he find? Dictatorships that have been turned into democracies and economic stagnation that has been transformed into growth.

The Present Crisis

by Paul Richvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

The passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement raised Mexican hopes. Now Mexico's own culture of corruption has dashed them. A report by Hoover fellow Paul Rich, who spends half of each year south of the border.

A Thatcherite Plan for Latin America

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

After getting under way in the 1980s, the privatization movement in Latin America has stalled out. Hoover fellow David R. Henderson argues that it can still be jump-started-if Latin leaders do what Margaret did.

Fujimori Speaks

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori almost never grants interviews to Americans. For Hoover fellow William Ratliff, he made an exception. How one man is attempting a revolution--and how his critics are responding.

Why Some Latin Countries Prosper and Others Don't

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Why do some Latin countries grow more quickly than others? Argentina, for example, more quickly than Venezuela? Hoover fellow David R. Henderson suggests a one-word answer. Freedom.

Judicial Reform in Latin America

by Edgardo Buscaglia, William Ratliff, Maria Dakoliasvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

The movement toward democracy and free markets in Latin America can only go so far if the courts remain corrupt and inefficient. Hoover fellow William Ratliff joins Edgardo Buscaglia Jr. and Maria Dakolias in describing the principal problems and in offering an outline for reform.

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