2008-2009 Research Fellows

Name Email
R. Richard Banks

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Terry S. Desser

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Paulla A. Ebron

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Paula Findlen

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Margot G. Gerritsen

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Sabine C. Girod

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Robert M. Gray

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Fredi Kronenberg

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Helen E. Longino

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Vinod Menon

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Lynn Meskell

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Deboleena Roy

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Nhung Tuyet Tran

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Christine Min Wotipka

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Richard N. Zare

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R. Richard Banks
The Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law, Stanford University

Rick Banks

An esteemed voice on a wide range of topics related to equality, Rick Banks focuses his scholarship on the use of race in public policy debates ranging from the adoption of children to the use of educational testing criteria in college admissions. He is especially interested in the rhetoric of civil rights discourse and the ways in which attachments to theories of color blindness might impede progress toward substantive racial equality. Before attending law school, Professor Banks was an extensively published freelance journalist, writing articles for the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune, among others.

Professor Banks came to Stanford in 1998. He was previously the Reginald F. Lewis Fellow at Harvard Law School; an attorney with the firm O'Melveny and Myers; and a law clerk to Judge Barrington D. Parker, Jr. of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

During his fellowship, Professor Banks will be writing a book focused on the state of marriage among the black middle class which will situate decisions about marriage and childbearing as a result of negotiations between men and women.

Professor Banks will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Terry S. Desser
Associate Professor of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center

Terry Desser

Terry Desser will be one of two Iris F. Litt, M.D. Fellows at the Clayman Institute. Dr. Desser is Associate Professor of Radiology and the Residency Program Director at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her AB degree from Princeton University and her MD from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. She has undertaken research in radiographic contrast media, both in the pharmaceutical industry and at Stanford, and recently has been pursuing work in applying simulation methods to Radiology education.

Since becoming residency program director in 2004, Dr. Desser has become interested in the problem of gender imbalance among practitioners of Radiology. She has organized evening events for women residents and medical students to raise awareness of Radiology as a specialty choice and to provide networking opportunities by introducing current women trainees to practicing women radiologists in the community. For her fellowship, Dr. Desser will expand these outreach efforts and will conduct research on female medical students' perception of Radiology and its changes over time. She will also work with the Office of Diversity to identify opportunities to foster mentoring of young female faculty in Diagnostic Radiology and throughout the medical school.

Dr. Desser will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Paulla A. Ebron
Associate Professor of Anthropology, Stanford University

Paulla Ebron is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. She is a cultural anthropologist with research interests in the African diaspora. Professor Ebron is the author of Performing Africa, (Princeton University Press) a work based on her research in The Gambia that traces the significance of West African praise-singers in transnational encounters. Her current project explores the dynamic transcontinental exchange involving West Africa, The British Empire, and the Caribbean, as well as the U.S. South. This book length project is entitled, "Making Tropical Africa in the Georgia Sea Islands."

For her fellowship, Professor Ebron will develop an aspect of her project focused on the notion of ethical citizenship. She traces the gendered ways political alliances have formed among women across multiple social identities. This focus allows for an appreciation of the dynamic coalitions that have advanced projects around citizenship and civil rights in the U.S. south.

Professor Ebron will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Paula Findlen
Ubaldo Pierotti Professor in Italian History, and Chair, Department of History; and Co-Director, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Stanford University

Paula Findlen


Paula Findlen is Ubaldo Pierotti Professor in Italian History and the Chair of the History Department at Stanford University. She has co-directed the Science, Technology and Society Program and the Program in the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology and is currently Co-Director of the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Prior to coming to Stanford in 1996, she taught at the University of California, Davis. Professor Findlen has held visiting appointments at Harvard University, the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, and elsewhere. She has most recently been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Professor Findlen's research focuses on the history of science and medicine in the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution. She has published extensively on natural history museums and scientific collecting, scientific culture in the age of Galileo, the relations between science and religion, and the history of women in science, and the social and cultural history of Italy since the Renaissance. Recent publications include Maria Gaetana Agnesi et. al., The Contest for Knowledge: Debates about Women's Education in Eighteenth-Century Italy (2005); and (with Wendy Wassying Roworth and Catherine Sama, eds., Italy's Eighteenth Century: Gender and Culture in the Age of the Grand Tour (2008).

For her fellowship, Professor Findlen is completing a major work on women and science in eighteenth-century Italy: "In the Shadow of Newton: Laura Bassi and Her World". She is in the final stages of writing this book, the culmination of many years of archival research into the unusual history of Italy's eighteenth-century women university graduates, professors, and academicians. Her research centers on the life and work of the Bolognese physicist, experimenter and university professor Laura Bassi (1711-78), exploring the circumstances that made her early and highly celebrated scientific career possible and the legacy it left behind.

Professor Findlen will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Margot G. Gerritsen
Assistant Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University

Margot Gerritsen

Margot Gerritsen's area of expertise is in the computer simulation of fluid flow processes. Her areas of interest include reservoir processes, coastal ocean dynamics and aerodynamics. Professor Gerritsen currently holds a faculty position in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering in the School of Earth Sciences. She is a core faculty member of the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering, and holds courtesy positions in Mechanical Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering. She teaches courses in applied mathematics, reservoir simulation, and energy processes.

Professor Gerritsen earned an MSc (Hons.) in Applied Mathematics from the University of Technology in Delft, Netherlands, and a PhD in Scientific Computing and Computational Mathematics from Stanford University. Before coming back to Stanford, she held a faculty position at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. In her spare time, Professor Gerritsen runs a podcast site called Smart Energy at www.smartenergyshow.com.

During her fellowship, Professor Gerritsen will provide opportunities for graduate women in her laboratory to explore new research directions through field trips; and to expand her activities as the producer of Smart Energy. She will also devote time writing about her experiences as a woman in the engineering field, using this to create presentations, blog entries, and a short publication offering tools for coping and succeeding in her field.

Professor Gerritsen will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Sabine C. Girod, MD, DDS, PhD
Associate Professor of Surgery (Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery/ENT by courtesy), and Director, Stanford Plastic Surgery Adult Clinic, Stanford University Medical Center and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital

Sabine C. Girod


Sabine Girod will be one of two Iris F. Litt, M.D. Fellows at the Clayman Institute. Dr. Girod is an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon and Assistant Professor in the Division of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery at Stanford University Medical Center, and the Chief of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the VA Palo Alto. She received her DDS from the University of Bonn, Germany, her MD from the University of Hannover Germany, and her PhD from the University of Cologne, Germany, for her work on "Tumor Suppressor Genes in Head and Neck Oncogenesis". She trained in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Germany and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Her special clinical and research interest is craniofacial reconstructive surgery for congenital deformities, traumatic injuries and tumors. She was the first female faculty in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in West-Germany and the first woman to receive the prestigious Wassmund Award of the German Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons for her academic and clinical work.

During her fellowship, Dr. Girod will be collaborating with the Office of Diversity and Gender at Stanford Medical School to support a program to expand diversity and excellence in recruitment of faculty in medicine. She is assembling the relevant gender research and literature in the field and will contribute to the development of an educational curriculum about gender/racial stereotyping and its consequences for science and medicine, career advancement, culture and knowledge of science, and substance of science and medicine.

Dr. Girod will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Robert M. Gray
Alcatel Lucent Technologies Professor of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University

Robert Gray

Robert M. Gray received his BS and MS from MIT in 1966 and his PhD from the University of Southern California in 1969, all in Electrical Engineering. Since 1969 he has been on the faculty of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His technical research has been in the area of information theory and signal processing. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2007 and in 2008 he will receive the Claude E. Shannon Award from the IEEE Information Theory Society and the Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal from the IEEE. He received a 2002 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM) and has since co-organized two workshops on mentoring for engineering academia aimed primarily at women, and he has edited the proceedings of both workshops.

During his fellowship, Professor Gray will explore means of improving awareness of the importance of and methods for recruiting and mentoring female students and junior faculty for careers in academia. He will work with the Center for Teaching and Learning and the Women in Electrical Engineering group to organize seminars and small workshops around visits by successful female engineering faculty members, including his former students, providing opportunities for students to interact with strong role models and better understand how to achieve professional and personal success in an academic environment.

Professor Gray will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Fredi Kronenberg
Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona Medical School

Fredi Kronenberg

Fredi Kronenberg is a physiologist and international leader in women's health and research in complementary and alternative approaches for menopausal women. She received her B.S. from Cornell University in neurobiology and behavior and her Ph.D. from Stanford University in physiology, where she researched thermoregulatory and reproductive physiology. Her postdoctoral research at Columbia University initiated her work in women's health and menopause. She is a leading expert in menopausal hot flashes, and alternative therapies to treat them.

Dr. Kronenberg is founding director of the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, one of the first 10 Centers funded by the NIH National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons. Her current affiliations are with The Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, and the New York Botanical Garden.

She is the author of numerous scientific and popular articles, and speaks widely across the country and internationally. In 1997 she received an American Health for Women Award: Ten Heroes in Women's Health, being recognized "for bringing alternative medicine into the mainstream." She also received the "A Friend Indeed Award" from the North American Menopause Society (NAMS); The 2004 NAMS/GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare Botanicals Research Award; the 2005 NAMS/Duramed Pharmaceuticals Vasomotor Symptoms Research Award; and the 2008 NAMS/Amerifit Brands Complementary and Alternative Medicine Research Award.

Dr. Kronenberg was a founding editor of the Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice and Policy. She is on the editorial board of the journals Menopause, Journal of Tropical and Medicinal Plants, EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing, and the Journal of Women's Health. She was co-founder of the North American Menopause Society, which has become the premier professional society in the field, is a founding member of the Consortium of Academic Medical Centers for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and on the Board of Trustees of the American Botanical Council.

During her fellowship, Dr. Kronenberg will work with Stanford colleagues: Marcia Stefanick, Professor of Medicine and head of the Women's Health Initiative; Craig Heller, Professor of Biological Sciences; John Cooke, Professor of Medicine; and Rachel Manber, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Together, they will develop a new hot flash physiology research team to examine mechanism of menopausal hot flashes and novel technologies for detecting hot flash onset and mitigation of hot flashes.

Dr. Kronenberg will be in residence at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to March 2009.

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Helen E. Longino
Clarence Irving Lewis Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy, Stanford University

Helen Longino

Helen Longino's teaching and research interests are in philosophy of science, social epistemology, and feminist philosophy. She is the author of Science As Social Knowledge (Princeton University Press, 1990), The Fate of Knowledge (Princeton University Press, 2001), and many articles in the philosophy of science, feminist philosophy and epistemology. Among her many co-edited volumes is the Scientific Pluralism, Vol. XIX of the Minnesota Studies in Philosophy of Science.

She is currently completing a book length comparative analysis of four approaches in the sciences of human behavior, focusing on research on aggression and research on sexual orientation. This analysis includes both an examination of the logical structures and interrelations of these approaches and a study of their social and cultural reception and uptake.

For her fellowship, Professor Longino will be working on a new project examining convergences and divergences in Western feminist and postcolonial feminist approaches to knowledge, rationality, and the idea of science.

Professor Longino will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Vinod Menon
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center

Vinod Menon

Vinod Menon is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Neuroscience, and Director of the Stanford Cognitive + Systems Neuroscience Laboratory in the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has broad multidisciplinary expertise that spans several scientific disciplines and has published extensively on various aspects of human cognition and brain function. He is especially interested in the development, maturation and organization of functional networks in the human brain, and its impact on cognition and behavior.

Dr. Menon is a graduate of the Indian Institute of Technology, where he received his B.Sc. (Hons.) degree in physics, and of the University of Texas at Austin, where he received his Ph.D. in computer science. He was a postdoctoral fellow in neurobiology at the University of California at Berkley and in cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging at Stanford University. He joined the department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine as Assistant Professor in 2000 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2003.

Dr. Menon has served on the National Science Foundation (NSF) Director's Advisory Panels on Neuroscience and Mathematics: Identifying Gaps to Bridge and on Educational Neuroscience. He currently serves as a charter member of the National Institutes of Health Study (NIH) Section on Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities and is on the editorial board of Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. During his fellowship, Professor Menon will use his funds to support an undergraduate student who is investigating gender differences in functional brain connectivity as part of an honors thesis in psychology.

Professor Menon will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Lynn Meskell
Professor of Anthropology, Stanford University

Lynn Meskell

Lynn Meskell's current research and teaching interests include a broad range of fields, including archaeology and heritage, ethnography in South African, identity and sociopolitics, gender and feminism, and ethics. Her current fieldwork and writing examines the constructs of natural and cultural heritage and the related discourses of empowerment around the Kruger National Park, ten years after democracy in South Africa. She is interested in the specific national understanding of biodiversity and its relationship to development initiatives, democracy, historic claims and land restitution. As founding editor of the Journal of Social Archaeology, she has attempted to forge a vehicle for interdisciplinary dialogue, bringing together a wide range of scholars from diverse fields to constitute the editorial panel (feminists, historians, social theorists, and ethnographers).

For her fellowship, Professor Meskell will use her funds to support collaborations with a female research colleague and to appoint a teaching replacement.

Professor Meskell will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Deboleena Roy
Associate Professor of Women's Studies and Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology, Emory University

Deboleena Roy

Deboleena Roy is an interdisciplinary scholar. She received her Ph.D. in molecular neuroendocrinology from the Institute of Medical Science at the University of Toronto. In her doctoral work, she examined the effects of estrogen and melatonin on the gene expression and cell signaling mechanisms in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons of the hypothalamus.

The focus of her current research and scholarship in feminist science studies is in the area of feminist theory in science. Her goal is to bridge feminist critiques of science with transformations in the processes of scientific knowledge production. She is interested in using feminist epistemologies and research methodologies in order to develop feminist practices in the natural sciences. Her teaching focuses on integrating biology and women's studies and addressing issues of gender, race and class in science education. She has published her work in journals such as Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy; Australian Feminist Studies; Rhizomes: Cultural Studies of Emerging Knowledge; Endocrinology; Neuroendocrinology; and the Journal of Biological Chemistry. In a recent article "Should Feminists Clone? And If So, How? Notes from an Implicated Modest Witness" (Australian Feminist Studies, Spring 2008) she grapples with a current project within feminist science studies to reconfigure the biological and explore the possibility that the sciences may provide useful tools and practices for the feminist scientist.

For her fellowship, Professor Roy will be developing a project in feminist neuroethics and will be working on her manuscript Mapping Gender, Hormones, and Neurons: Feminist Configurations in the Neurosciences.

Professor Roy will be in residence at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Nhung Tuyet Tran
Assistant Professor of History and Canada Research Chair in Southeast Asian History, University of Toronto

Nhung Tuyet Tran is Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Southeast Asian History at the University of Toronto. She was trained in Chinese history at the University of Pennsylvania (B.A. & Ph.D. Studies) and Southeast Asian history at the University of California Los Angeles (Ph.D.). Her intellectual interests lie at the intersection of gender, law, and religious practice in early modern Vietnamese society. She has published in the Journal of Asian Studies and Gender and History and is the co-editor of Viet Nam: Borderless Histories (U. Wisconsin, 2006), a collection of revisionist essays on Vietnamese History.

Her published and forthcoming works problematize the links between the appropriation of Vietnamese gender relations to construct Vietnamese historical identity. She is also working on a project that explores the social and cultural history of Vietnamese Catholicism using written sources written in the demotic script, chu nom. She has organized several international conferences on Vietnamese Studies and is involved in initiatives that bridge the gaps between Vietnamese and Western scholarship on Viet Nam.

During her fellowship, Professor Tran will be completing her manuscript on the social history of gender, titled, Vietnamese Women at the Crossroads of Southeast Asia: Gender and Society in the Early Modern Period. She will also continue working on a monograph-length cultural history of Vietnamese Catholicism in the same period.

Professor Tran will be in residence at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Christine Min Wotipka
Assistant Professor of Education and, by courtesy, Sociology, Stanford University

Christine Min Wotipka is Assistant Professor of Education and (by courtesy) Sociology, and Director of the Master's Program in International Comparative Education at Stanford University. Her research interests include women and science, international human rights, globalization, and higher education. Professor Wotipka's current projects include a cross-national study of female faculty and another on changing notions of citizenship and human rights as evidenced in social science textbooks. She holds degrees in International Comparative Education (PhD) and Sociology (AM) from Stanford University and International Relations and French (BA, highest honors) from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Before returning to Stanford in 2006, Professor Wotipka was Global Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor at the UCLA International Institute in 2003-04; Associate Director of Programs at MentorNet; and Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Minnesota.

For her fellowship, Professor Wotipka is re-developing two courses in the School of Education: "Gender and Higher Education" and "Education and the Status of Women: Comparative Perspectives". She will use her funds, in part, to support a research assistant.

Professor Wotipka will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Richard N. Zare
Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and, Chair, Chemistry Department, Stanford University

Dick Zare

Richard N. Zare is the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science at Stanford University with an appointment in the Department of Chemistry and a courtesy appointment in the Department of Physics. He is a graduate of Harvard University, where he received his B.A. degree in chemistry and physics in 1961 and his Ph.D. in chemical physics in 1964. In 1977 he moved to Stanford University from Columbia University. He has been active in public service, serving on the National Science Board, the policy-setting body of the National Science Foundation from 1992 to 1998, the last two years as its chair. He is presently Chair of the Board of Directors of Annual Reviews, and in 2008 he was elected as a Fellow of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS).

Professor Zare is an enthusiastic and dedicated teacher who was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Professor in 2006. Zare is also renowned for his research in the area of lasers applied to chemical reactions and to chemical analysis. He is the recipient of the National Medal of Science in 1983, the Welch Award in Chemistry in 1999, and the Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 2005. He has trained over one hundred graduate students who have received their Ph.D. degrees. In June 2009 Zare was named Priestly Medalist for lifetime of scientific achievement and service to chemistry. Read more»

For his fellowship, Professor Zare will use his funds to provide two undergraduate women with employment in his laboratory over Summer Quarter.

Professor Zare will be a fellow at the Clayman Institute from September 2008 to June 2009.

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Deborah M. Kolb
Deloitte Ellen Gabriel Professor for Women and Leadership, School of Management Simmons College

Deborah Kolb has regrettably had to give up her fellowship in 2008 for personal reasons.

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