Archive for 'Leadership & Advocacy'

Women, Marriage, and Job Opportunity in the Muslim World

In post-revolution Egypt, western onlookers pose the burning question of what rights the new governments will accord to women. Will women be included in a new democracy, or will there be a revival of strict fundamentalist law? According to Stanford researcher and professor of political science, Lisa Blaydes, the question of women’s rights is not so straight-forward as simply introducing western-style reforms.

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“Smashing the Masher:” The early women’s movement against street harassment in America

According to Estelle Freedman, the Edgar E. Robinson Professor in U.S. History at Stanford University, aggressive male street flirts, or “mashers,” were a widespread and vexatious problem for American urban women in the pre-suffrage era. One of the most interesting things about the masher problem, she said, was the evolving public response to it. At first newspapers urged respectable men to play a stronger role in protecting women from ogling and catcalls. Gradually though, women began taking matters into their own hands.

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Perception is key to retaining women in academic medicine

A team of Stanford University Medical Center researchers found that while male and female faculty members are leaving Stanford in comparable numbers based on the gender mix of the faculty, women are giving notice sooner than their male peers. But what was surprising was that the majority were moving to comparable institutions—not relocating to community clinics or pure research enterprises.

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Shortchanged: Women and the wealth gap

On the surface, the financial gender gap appears to be closing. Women now earn 78 cents for every dollar men earn, and women under 25 working full-time earn 95% of what their male peers earn. As researcher Mariko Chang revealed, income tells only part of the story. Despite the rise of women’s earnings to 78% of men’s, women own only 36% as much wealth.

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2011 Spring Series: gender and the intersections of race, class and sexuality

The Clayman Institute’s Spring 2011 Series addresses the uneven nature of the stall in the gender revolution, looking at the intersections of race, class and sexuality. Our speakers will look at these intersections to see what they can tell us about the stall and present workable solutions to move beyond where we are today.

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