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Splash Spring 2016 is April 9-10

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  • Registration opens on 3/16 at 7:30pm.
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  • Student Guide

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ESP Biography



NANDITA GARUD, ESP Teacher




Major: Genetics

College/Employer: Stanford

Year of Graduation: G

Picture of Nandita Garud

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Not Available.



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

B3431: A brief introduction to population genetics in Splash! Spring 2014
The human genome is comprised of three billion base pairs, of which, 99% are identical across the entire human population. Only a very small fraction of the genome harbors any variation. It is this small, variable fraction that plays an important role in natural selection and can inform us about events such as demography. With genomic sequencing technology becoming increasingly cheap and accessible to the public, we are now entering an exciting era of personalized genomics and medicine. In this course, we will learn about the signatures of genetic variation that can help us understand our susceptibility to diseases and our human demographic history.


B3078: A brief introduction to population genetics in Splash! Fall 2013
The human genome is comprised of three billion base pairs, of which, 99% are identical across the entire human population. Only a very small fraction of the genome harbors any variation. It is this small, variable fraction that plays an important role in natural selection and can inform us about events such as demography. With genomic sequencing technology becoming increasingly cheap and accessible to the public, we are now entering an exciting era of personalized genomics and medicine. In this course, we will learn about the signatures of genetic variation that can help us understand our susceptibility to diseases and our human demographic history.


B2850: A brief introduction to population genetics in Splash! Spring 2013
The human genome is comprised of three billion base pairs, of which, over 99% are identical across the entire human population. Only a very small fraction of the genome harbors any variation. It is this small, variable fraction that plays an important role in natural selection and can inform us about past human demographic events including migrations, changes in population size, and the mixing of different populations. As a result of the decreasing price of genomic sequencing technologies and its accessibility to the public, we have entered an exciting era of personalized genomics and medicine. How can we interpret this newly available genomic data, including our own genomes? In this course, we will learn about the signatures of genetic variation that can help us understand our susceptibility to diseases and our human demographic history.


B2429: A brief introduction to population genetics in Splash! Fall 2012
The human genome is comprised of three billion base pairs, of which, surprisingly, 99.9% of the base pairs are identical across the entire human population. Only a very small fraction of the genome harbors any variation. It is this small, variable fraction that plays an important role in natural selection and can inform us about historical events such as human migration. We will be discussing and using hands-on activities to illustrate various forces in evolution including drift, selection, demography, and mutation. We will look at case studies in biological organisms that highlight the impact of these evolutionary forces, including studies on human ancestry, disease and personalized medicine.


B2299: A brief introduction to population genetics in Splash! Spring 2012
The human genome is comprised of three billion base pairs, of which, surprisingly, 99% is identical across the entire human population. Only a very small fraction of the genome harbors any variation. It is this small, variable fraction that plays an important role in natural selection, and, can inform us about events such as demography. With genomic sequencing technology becoming increasingly cheap and accessible to the public, we are now entering an exciting era of personalized genomics and medicine. In this course, we will learn about the signatures of genetic variation that can help us understand our susceptibility to diseases and our human demographic history.