Climate Change from the Past to the Future (ESS 57Q)

Code: 
57Q
General Education Requirement(s): 
WAY-SMA
Preference to sophomores. Numeric models to predict how climate responds to increase of greenhouse gases. Paleoclimate during times in Earth's history when greenhouse gas concentrations were elevated with respect to current concentrations. Predicted scenarios of climate models and how these models compare to known hyperthermal events in Earth history. Interactions and feedbacks among biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere.
Subject: 
EARTHSYS
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Climate Change: Science & Society

Code: 
37N
General Education Requirement(s): 
GER: DB-NatSci
Preference to freshmen. How and why do greenhouse gases cause climate to change? How will a changing climate affect humans and natural ecosystems? What can be done to prevent climate change and better adapt to the climate change that does occur? Focus is on developing quantitative understanding of these issues rooted in both the physical and social sciences. Exercises based on simple quantitative observations and calculations; algebra only, no calculus.
Subject: 
EARTHSYS
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Energy in the Southwest (CEE 16SC, ENERGY 11SC)

Code: 
25SC
The technical, social, and political issues surrounding energy management and use in the West, using California, Nevada, and Arizona as a field laboratory. Students explore energy narratives, such as: Who supplies our energy and from what sources? How is it transported? Who distributes to users and how do they do it? Water for energy and energy for water, two intertwined natural resources. Meeting carbon emission goals by 2020. Conflicts between desert ecosystems and renewable energy development. Emphasis on renewable energy sources and the water-energy nexus.
Subject: 
POLISCI
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Climate Variability during the Holocene: Understanding what is Natural Climate Change

Code: 
219
Many elements of the debate about attribution of modern climate change to man-made influences hinge on understanding the past history of climate as well as forcing functions such as solar output, volcanism, and "natural" trace gas variability. Interest in Holocene reconstructions of past climate and forcing functions has surged in the last 20 years providing a robust literature set for discussion and analysis.
Subject: 
ESS
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

When Technology Meets Reality; An In-depth Look at the Deepwater Horizon Blowout and Oil Spill

Code: 
123
The Deepwater Horizon blowout and spill in April 2010 occurred on one of the most advanced deepwater drilling rigs in the world operated by one of the most experienced companies. In this course we will look at and discuss the technologies and management practices involved in deepwater drilling and discuss how an accident like this happens and what could have been done differently to avoid it. We will focus on the Horizon and also look briefly at other high profile industrial and technological accidents.
Subject: 
ENERGY
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Biology and Global Change (BIO 117, ESS 111)

Code: 
111
General Education Requirement(s): 
GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or graduate standing.
Subject: 
EARTHSYS
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Numerical Weather Prediction

Code: 
263B
Numerical weather prediction. Continuity equations for air and water vapor, the thermodynamic energy equation, and momentum equations derived for the atmosphere. Numerical methods of solving partial differential equations, including finite-difference, finite-element, semi-Lagrangian, and pseudospectral methods. Time-stepping schemes: the forward-Euler, backward-Euler, Crank-Nicolson, Heun, Matsuno, leapfrog, and Adams-Bashforth schemes. Boundary-layer turbulence parameterizations, soil moisture, and cloud modeling. Project developing a basic weather prediction model.
Subject: 
CEE
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Energy in the Southwest (ENERGY 11SC, POLISCI 25SC)

Code: 
16SC
The technical, social, and political issues surrounding energy management and use in the West, using California, Nevada, and Arizona as a field laboratory. Students explore energy narratives, such as: Who supplies our energy and from what sources? How is it transported? Who distributes to users and how do they do it? Water for energy and energy for water, two intertwined natural resources. Meeting carbon emission goals by 2020. Conflicts between desert ecosystems and renewable energy development. Emphasis on renewable energy sources and the water-energy nexus.
Subject: 
CEE
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, ESS 111)

Code: 
117
General Education Requirement(s): 
GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or graduate standing.
Subject: 
BIO
Academic Year: 
2015-2016

Policy and Climate Change

Code: 
121
Science and economics, including recent findings. History and evolution of local, state, regional, national, and international policy. California's recent landmark climate change bill. Future policy prospects, emphasizing national and international levels.
Subject: 
PUBLPOL
Academic Year: 
2015-2016