Clean-energy revolution is happening, U.S. energy officials and Stanford researchers agree

Mark Godfrey Mungal

Type: 
Energy Faculty

Plasma enhanced combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and fuel blends using nanosecond pulsed discharges. Drag reducing polymers for energy efficiency. Simulation of hypersonic flight.

Photo: 

Combustion Applications

Code: 
372
The role of chemical and physical processes in combustion; ignition, flammability, and quenching of combustible gas mixtures; premixed turbulent flames; laminar and turbulent diffusion flames; combustion of fuel droplets and sprays. Prerequisite: 371.
Subject: 
ME
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Combustion Fundamentals

Code: 
371
Heat of reaction, adiabatic flame temperature, and chemical composition of products of combustion; kinetics of combustion and pollutant formation reactions; conservation equations for multi-component reacting flows; propagation of laminar premixed flames and detonations. Prerequisite: 362A or 370A, or consent of instructor.
Subject: 
ME
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Energy Systems III: Projects

Code: 
370C
Refinement and calibration of energy system models generated in ME 370B carrying the models to maturity and completion. Integration of device models into a larger model of energy systems. Prerequisites: 370A,B, consent of instructor.
Subject: 
ME
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Energy Systems II: Modeling and Advanced Concepts

Code: 
370B
Development of quantitative device models for complex energy systems, including fuel cells, reformers, combustion engines, and electrolyzers, using thermodynamic and transport analysis. Student groups work on energy systems to develop conceptual understanding, and high-level, quantitative and refined models. Advanced topics in thermodynamics and special topics associated with devices under study. Prerequisite: 370A.
Subject: 
ME
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Energy Systems I: Thermodynamics

Code: 
370A
Thermodynamic analysis of energy systems emphasizing systematic methodology for and application of basic principles to generate quantitative understanding. Exergy, mixtures, reacting systems, phase equilibrium, chemical exergy, and modern computational methods for analysis. Prerequisites: undergraduate engineering thermodynamics and computer skills such as Matlab.
Subject: 
ME
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Internal Combustion Engines

Code: 
250
Internal combustion engines including conventional and turbocharged spark ignition, and diesel engines. Lectures: basic engine cycles, engine components, methods of analysis of engine performance, pollutant emissions, and methods of engine testing. Lab involves hands-on experience with engines and test hardware. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: 140.
Subject: 
ME
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s): 

Thermal Recovery Methods

Code: 
226
Theory and practice of thermal recovery methods: steam drive, cyclic steam injections, and in situ combustion. Models of combined mass and energy transport. Estimates of heated reservoir volume and oil recovery performance. Wellbore heat losses, recovery production, and field examples.
Subject: 
ENERGY
Academic Year: 
2015-2016
Section(s):