Chemical Engineering

Zhenan Bao: On a Quest to Develop Artificial Skin

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Research News

A team of engineers works on a material that can flex like skin, transmit sensory data to the brain and restore a sense of touch.

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Zhenan Bao: On a Quest to Develop Artificial Skin
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A team of engineers works on a material that can flex like skin, transmit sensory data to the brain and restore a sense of touch.

 

Stanford chemical engineering Professor Zhenan Bao has spent a decade trying to develop materials that can flex and heal like skin, and also serve as the sensor net sending touch, temperature and pain signals to the brain. In a scientific journal, Bao’s team recently demonstrated a first — a skin-like material that could detect pressure and transmit signals to nerve cells. In this video, Bao shares how her team’s research could improve our ability to monitor health and potentially add a sense of touch to prosthetic limbs.

Last modified Wed, 9 Mar, 2016 at 14:02

What Matters to Me & Why - Sidney and Persis Drell

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Wednesday, May 4, 2016.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor  Map

Open to all

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2016. 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: 
Common Room, Center for Inter-Religious Community, Learning and Experiences (CIRCLE), Old Union, 3rd Floor
Contact Info: 
dianea1@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free, open to all

Last modified Wed, 2 Mar, 2016 at 14:44

The economic damage from climate change may be more than you think — much more.

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Research News

Researchers say the cost of carbon dioxide emissions may be six times more than government estimates.

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The economic damage from climate change may be more than you think — much more.
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Researchers say the cost of carbon dioxide emissions may be six times more than government estimates.

A new study calculating the economic impacts of climate change shows that the costs of carbon dioxide emissions have been underestimated. | Photo by Robert S. Donovan

Last modified Fri, 26 Feb, 2016 at 11:13

Can large-scale solar power storage become a reality?

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Research News

An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce, store and consume energy.

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Can large-scale solar power storage become a reality?
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An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce, store and consume energy.

The solar energy of the past? REUTERS/Stringer

The recent crash in oil prices notwithstanding, an economy based on fossil fuels seems unsustainable. Supplies of oil, coal and similar fuels are finite, and even if new sources are found, global warming must be considered. Limitless solar power remains the Holy Grail, but among other obstacles to widespread adoption, society needs ways to store solar energy and deliver power when the sun isn't shining.

Last modified Fri, 26 Feb, 2016 at 14:50

The National Academy of Engineering elects four new Stanford faculty members

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Research News

Three engineers and a biochemist are selected for the field’s highest professional honor.

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The National Academy of Engineering elects four new Stanford faculty members
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Three engineers and a biochemist are selected for the field’s highest professional honor.

Four Stanford professors have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 2016, the highest professional honor that can be bestowed in the field.

According to a statement on the NAE website the four new Stanford members are:

Last modified Sat, 13 Feb, 2016 at 8:18

New Stanford battery shuts down at high temperatures and restarts when it cools

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Research News

Stanford researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that turns on and off depending on the temperature. The new technology could prevent battery fires that have plagued laptops, hoverboards and other electronic devices.

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Lithium-ion battery shuts down before overheating
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Researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that could prevent battery fires

Stanford researchers have developed the first lithium-ion battery that shuts down before overheating, then restarts immediately when the temperature cools.

Last modified Wed, 3 Feb, 2016 at 8:09

Stanford engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution

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Research News

A new tool enables researchers to test millions of mutated proteins in a matter of hours or days, speeding the search for new medicines, industrial enzymes and biosensors.

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Researchers invent process to accelerate protein evolution
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Stanford engineers can test millions of protein variants in a matter of hours

All living things require proteins, members of a vast family of molecules that nature "makes to order" according to the blueprints in DNA.

Through the natural process of evolution, DNA mutations generate new or more effective proteins. Humans have found so many alternative uses for these molecules – as foods, industrial enzymes, anti-cancer drugs – that scientists are eager to better understand how to engineer protein variants designed for specific uses.

Last modified Thu, 10 Dec, 2015 at 16:25

Stanford engineers among recipients of Precourt Institute and TomKat Center $2.1 million grants

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Research Profile

Grants will fund groundbreaking energy research

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Stanford Engineers receive Precort, TomKat grants
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Grants will fund groundbreaking energy research

The Precourt Institute for Energy and the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy at Stanford have awarded 12 faculty seed grants totaling $2.1 million for groundbreaking research on clean energy.  Launched in 2010, the seed-grant program funds faculty research with the potential for high impact on energy supply and use. 

Last modified Thu, 3 Dec, 2015 at 13:05