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FEMST 138: Violence Against Women: Theory, Issues, and Prevention (FEMST 238)

Course offers an interdisciplinary feminist perspectives on the causes of gender violence, addresses multi-leveled approaches to ending gender violence and explores the relationship between violence against women and other forms of oppression such as racism, economic exploitation, heterosexism, and social class. Framework addresses institutional barriers maintaining this violence in our culture and how solutions must also be multidimensional. All students, women and men, are encouraged to become allies in this effort and will apply theoretical perspectives to campus service-learning projects. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Baran, N. (PI)

FEMST 140D: LGBT History in the United States (HISTORY 257C)

An introductory course on LGBT social, cultural, and political history in the United States. This course explores how categories of sexuality have changed over time, with particular emphasis on the relationship among homosexuality, heterosexuality, and transgenderism. Students will analyze how the intersections of race, class, and sexuality influenced the constitution of these categories and the politics of social relations. Historical and literary sources will be used to examine changes in LGBT experiences and identities, primarily in the twentieth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Davies, A. (PI)

FEMST 260: Seminar in Women's Health: Women and Disabilities (FEMST 360)

Explores visible and invisible disabilities, women's psychological as well as physical health, issues of access, caretaking, self-definition and the diversity of disabled women's identities. Disabilities covered include blindness, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, emotional and learning disabilities, and conditions requiring wheelchairs and other forms of physical assistance. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Krieger, S. (PI)

FRENLIT 131: Absolutism, Enlightenment, and Revolution in 17th- and 18th-Century France

The literature, culture, and politics of France from Louis XIV to Olympe de Gouges. How this period produced the political and philosophical foundations of modernity. Readings include Corneille, Molière, Racine, Lafayette, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, and Gouges. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERLIT 132: Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture

A study of literary movements in their philosophical and historical contexts. Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism. What changes defined German culture between the age of Napoleon to the eve of the First World War? How did Germany become a unified nation? The influence of thinkers such as Marx, Nietzsche and Freud. Taught in German.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

HISTORY 4N: A World History of Genocide

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 10B: Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) Survey of early modern European history from the Reformation through the Enlightenment. Topics include sovereignty and the state, courtly life and manners, science and technology, the print and military revolutions, piety and religious practice, popular culture and village life, women and gender, witchcraft and sexual deviance, the rose if international trade, the history of consumption and material things, encounters with non-Western peoples and colonialism, and scholarship and the republic of letters.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fredona, R. (PI)

HISTORY 11N: The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall (CLASSHIS 24N)

Preference to Freshmen. Prerequisite: IHUM 69A. Explore themes on the Roman Empire and its decline from the 1st through the 5th centuries C.E.. What was the political and military glue that held this diverse, multi-ethnic empire together? What were the bases of wealth and how was it distributed? What were the possibilities and limits of economic growth? How integrated was it in culture and religion? What were the causes and consequences of the conversion to Christianity? Why did the Empire fall in the West? How suitable is the analogy of the U.S. in the 21st century?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:IHUM-3, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 33A: Blood and Roses: The Age of the Tudors

(Same as HISTORY 133A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 133A.) English society and state from the Wars of the Roses to the death of Elizabeth. Political, social, and cultural upheavals of the Tudor period and the changes wrought by the Reformation. The establishment of the Tudor monarchy; destruction of the Catholic church; rise of Puritanism; and 16th-century social and economic changes.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 34A: European Witch Hunts

(Same as HISTORY 134A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 134A.) After the Reformation, in the midst of state building and scientific discovery, Europeans conducted a series of deadly witch hunts, violating their own laws and procedures in the process. What was it about early modernity that fueled witch hunting? Witch trials and early modern demonology as well as historians' interpretations of events to seek answers to this question.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)
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