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GERMAN 132: Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany (COMPLIT 132A)

Key moments in German history through documents: personal accounts, political speeches and texts, and literary works. The course begins with the Prussian monarchy and proceeds to the crisis years of the French Revolution. Documents from the 1848 revolution and the age of Bismarck and German unification follow. World War I and its impact on Germany, including the rise of Hitler, as well as the aftermath, divided Germany in the Cold War through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in German.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 182: War and Warfare in Germany

Survey of Germany at war through historical, theoretical and literary accounts. War in the international system and the role of technology. Religious wars, rationalization of warfare, violence and politics, terrorism. War films, such as All Quiet on the Western Front. Readings by authors such as Clausewitz, Jünger, Remarque, Schimtt, and Arendt. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GLOBAL 210: Urdu Literature and Bombay Cinema (FEMGEN 210)

What are some of the major themes that drive modern Urdu literature as well as the ¿Muslim Social¿ genre of Bombay Cinema? How can we place these cultural texts within their historical context? Urdu literature and Bombay Cinema provide compelling windows into the crisis of modernity both within South Asia and Muslim societies. In this seminar, we will start with a discussion on the emergence of print culture and its impact on the world of Urdu poetry and an exploration of the work of reformers who viewed Urdu as ¿the language of secular Islam.¿ Next we will engage with the anticolonial Progressive Writers Movement as well as the trauma of Partition and its reflection in literature and film. The course will conclude with a discussion of the contemporary Indian nostalgia for a cosmopolitan Indo-Muslim past. Through projects and presentations, students will hone their written and oral communication skills. They will also practice approaching works of art and literature with a critical lens. Ultimately this course will provide students with a better understanding of the society, literary and film of Muslim South Asia. Literary cultures of Muslim South Asia are not a fixed and unchanging, but rather a set of representations that are constantly shifting and adapting to reflect the context of society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jaffer, S. (PI)

GSBGEN 113N: The Economic Survival of the Performing Arts

Even the most artistically accomplished and well-managed performing arts organizations--symphony orchestras, operas, dance companies, and many theaters--tend to live on the edge financially. In fact, most performing arts groups are organized as nonprofit organizations, because they cannot make enough money to cover costs and survive as profit-seeking businesses. In this seminar we will explore the reasons for the tension between artistic excellence and economic security,drawing on the experience of performing arts organizations in the United States and in countries(whose governments have adopted quite different policies toward the arts). Using economic concepts and analysis that we develop in the seminar, you will first examine the fundamental reasons for the economic challenges faced by performing arts organizations. In later sessions, we will consider and evaluate alternative solutions to these challenges in the United States and other countries. The seminar may include meetings with managers and/or trustees of arts organizations.nnnBy the end of the seminar, you will be able to assess the economic condition of an arts organization, evaluate alternative strategies for its survival, and understand the consequences of alternative government policies toward the arts.nnnDuring the early part of the course, you will prepare two short papers on topics or questions that I will suggest. Later, you will prepare a longer paper applying concepts learned to one of the performing arts or a particular arts organization that interests you. You will submit that paper in stages, as you learn about concepts and issues that are relevant to your analysis. There will also be a final exam.
Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Flanagan, R. (PI)

HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, and hierarchy, emphasizing the three great turning points in early history: the evolution of modern humans, the agricultural revolution, and the rise of the state.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 4: Introduction to Geospatial Humanities (HISTORY 104)

This course introduces undergraduate students to the theory and methods of the geospatial humanities, understood broadly as the application of GIS techniques and other quantitative methods in the humanistic study of social and cultural patterns in past and present settings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 4N: A World History of Genocide (JEWISHST 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 4S: Crimes Against Humanity (GERMAN 45)

What is a crime against humanity and how can it be punished? Starting with the Nuremberg Trials, this seminar will consider how the juridical category of crimes against humanity came into existence and has evolved over the past half century. Thinking through core questions posed by Hannah Arendt, we will consider how crimes against humanity are to be understood in the context of modern jurisprudence, who perpetrates such crimes, and what relationship exists between crimes against humanity and modernity. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Huneke, S. (PI)

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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