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HISTORY 247: Violence in African History: Conflict and Healing in sub-Saharan Africa (HISTORY 347)

This course questions what constitutes "violence" in African history, and why it occurred when it did. We will examine the subtleties of "violence" in African history, which have sometimes led to conflicts, and sometimes to rich strategies of healing and improvisation. These include ecological crises, domestic violence, corruption, economic exploitation, and demographic crises (including urbanization and diseases such as HIV-AIDS). While we begin by examining ideas about conflict in pre-colonial Africa, the course focuses on the colonial and post-colonial eras in African history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 250E: Taxing America: From the Puritans to Prop. 13

Taxes have shaped American society and politics since before the Revolution. And they've been extremely controversial just as long. In this course we'll try to understand American society and government by looking at the politics of taxation from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Topics include the legitimacy of taxation, the constitution, economic development, inequality, gender, and race.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 252K: America as a World Power: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1914 to Present (INTNLREL 168)

This course will examine the modern history of American foreign relations, from 1914 to the present. Beginning with the fateful decision to intervene in the First World War, it will examine the major crises and choices that have defined the ¿American Century.¿ Our study of U.S. foreign relations will consider such key factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, bureaucracy, psychology, race, and culture. Students will be expected to undertake their own substantial examination of a critical episode in the era studied.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 254G: The Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution

Why did Britain's North American colonies declare independence from an empire they had long revered? What did the American Revolution mean for the people who experienced it? In this course we will explore the explosive origins of the American republic. Topics: revolutionary ideology, empire, the federal constitution, slavery, social conflict, and the international consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 257C: LGBT/Queer Life in the United States (FEMGEN 140D, FEMGEN 240D)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Davies, A. (PI)

HISTORY 258: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available on Coursework) by Dec. 1, 2015 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 259E: American Interventions, 1898-Present (HISTORY 359E, INTNLREL 168A)

This class seeks to examine the modern American experience with limited wars, beginning with distant and yet pertinent cases, and culminating in the war in Iraq. Although this class will examine war as a consequence of foreign policy, it will not focus primarily on presidential decision making. Rather, it will place wartime policy in a broader frame, considering it alongside popular and media perceptions of the war, the efforts of antiwar movements, civil-military relations, civil reconstruction efforts, and conditions on the battlefield. We will also examine, when possible, the postwar experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (CSRE 260, URBANST 169)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

HISTORY 261G: Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History (INTNLREL 173)

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)
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