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21 - 30 of 162 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 120: Living in a Material World: Seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish Painting (ARTHIST 320)

Painting and graphic arts by artists in Flanders and Holland from 1600 to 1680, a period of political and religious strife. Historical context; their relationship to developments in the rest of Europe and contributions to the problem of representation. Preferences for particular genres such as portraits, landscapes, and scenes of everyday life; the general problem of realism as manifested in the works studied.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 121: 18th-Century Art in Europe, ca 1660-1780 (ARTHIST 321)

Major developments in painting across Europe including the High Baroque illusionism of Bernini, the founding of the French Academy, and the revival of antiquity during the 1760s, with parallel developments in Venice, Naples, Madrid, Bavaria, and London. Shifts in themes and styles amidst the emergence of new viewing publics. Artists: the Tiepolos, Giordano, Batoni, and Mengs; Ricci, Pellegrini, and Thornhill; Watteau and Boucher; Chardin and Longhi; Reynolds and West; Hogarth and Greuze; Vien, Fragonard, and the first works by David. Additional discussion for graduate students.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 122: The Age of Revolution: Painting in Europe 1780-1830 (ARTHIST 322)

Survey of European painting bracketed by the French Revolution and the end of the Napoleonic conquest. Against this background of social upheavel, the visual arts were profoundly affected by shifts in patronage, public, and ideas about the social utility of image making. Lectures and readings align ruptures in the tradition of representation with the unfolding historical situation, and trace the first manifestations of a "romantic" alternative to the classicism that was the cultural legacy of pre-Revolutionary Europe.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Marrinan, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 123N: Thinking about Visual Attention : from Balzac to Facebook

Writing in 1829, the French author Honoré de Balzac celebrated the acute visual attention of the flâneur, a character he closely associates with modern life: "To flâne is to take pleasure, to collect flashes of wit, to admire sublime scenes of unhappiness, of love, of joy as well as graceful or grotesque portraits, to thrust one's attention into the depths of a thousand lives." In July 2012 the Huffington Report pointed to a fact of modern life: "On city streets, in suburban parking lots and in shopping centers, there is usually someone strolling while talking on a phone, texting with his head down, listening to music, or playing a video game. The problem isn't as widely discussed as distracted driving, but the danger is real." These two very different ways of circulating in urban space suggest that a major shift in how we humans relate to our environment has occurred over the course of nearly two centuries--especially in the densely populated spaces of modern cities. Where the great spectacle of urban life was a marvel of the nineteenth century, today's inhabitants want mainly to block it out by insulating themselves in a cocoon of favorite music or personal conversation, whether by voice or text, that they risk stepping into traffic, colliding with lightposts, or bumping into others similarly self-absorbed. This seminar proposes to think about the hows and whys of that important shift from the unique perspective of art history, a field of study especially attuned to the limits and exigencies of visual acuity. We will explore the topic across a range of media, from daguerreotypes to stereoscopes, from paintings to films, from television screen to the hand-held displays of our smartphones.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Marrinan, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 124: The Age of Naturalism, Painting in Europe1830-1874 (ARTHIST 324)

Survey of European painting from the heyday of Romanticism to the first Impressionist exhibition. Lectures and readings focus on the tensions between traditional forms and ambitions of history painting and the challenge of "modern" subjects drawn from contemporary life. Attention to the impact of painting in the open-air, and the effect of new imaging technologies- notably lithography and photography - to provide "popular" alternatives to the hand-wrought character and elitist appeal of "high art" cultural forms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Marrinan, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 126: Post-Naturalist Painting (ARTHIST 326)

How conceptual models from language, literature, new technologies, and scientific theory affected picture making following the collapse of the radical naturalism of the 1860s and 1870s. Bracketed in France by the first Impressionist exhibition (1874) and the first public acclamation of major canvases by Matisse and Picasso (1905), the related developments in England, Germany, Belgium, and Austria. Additional weekly discussion for graduate students. Recommended: some prior experience with 19th-century art.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 127A: African Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present (AFRICAST 127)

This course explores the relationship between art and politics in twentieth century Africa. Artistic production and consumption is considered in the context of various major political shifts, from the experience of colonialism to the struggle against Apartheid. Each week we will look closely at different works of art and examine how artists and designers responded to such challenges as independence, modernization and globalization. We will look at painting, sculpture, religious art, public and performance art, photography and film. How western perceptions and understanding of African art have shifted, and how museums have framed African art throughout the twentieth century will remain important points of discussion throughout the course.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 132: American Art and Culture, 1528-1910 (AMSTUD 132, ARTHIST 332)

The visual arts and literature of the U.S. from the beginnings of European exploration to the Civil War. Focus is on questions of power and its relation to culture from early Spanish exploration to the rise of the middle classes. Cabeza de Vaca, Benjamin Franklin, John Singleton Copley, Phillis Wheatley, Charles Willson Peale, Emerson, Hudson River School, American Genre painters, Melville, Hawthorne and others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 140N: Couture Culture: Fashion, Art & Modernism from Manet to Mondrian

This course examines the ways in which fashion has figured in the construction of modern experience and how it has been represented in the visual arts, primarily in Europe and the United States between about 1850 and 1965. Alongside the emergence of haute couture, the rise of the ready-to-wear industry during this period coincided with the consolidation of the department store; these institutions contributed to the development of a culture of consumption and display that continues to shape our lives today. Manet, Degas and other Impressionist painters were sensitive the nuances of fashion, which they, like Baudelaire, saw as an aspect of modernity indispensable to their art. Clothing was no less significant in the context of the Russian revolution, when Alexander Rodchenko, for example, outfitted himself in a home-made version of workers' overalls in order to reinforce his identification with factory laborers and thereby to suggest the breaking down of class distinctions. The course also explores the significance of fashion for an abstract painter like Piet Mondrian, but, more to the point, we look at how Mondrian's work was appropriated to the world of fashion by Yves Saint-Laurent, who assured that Mondrian's signature geometric style would become instantly recognizable and eventually function as a hugely popular brand. The circuits through which we can trace the historical trajectory of fashion will illuminate its importance for understanding many facets of modern culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 142: Architecture Since 1900 (ARTHIST 342)

The development of competing versions of modern and postmodern architecture and design in Europe and America, from the early 20th century to the present. Recommended: 141.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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