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1 - 10 of 24 results for: CHINGEN ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CHINGEN 91: Traditional East Asian Culture: China

Required for Chinese and Japanese majors. Introduction to Chinese culture in a historical context. Topics include political and socioeconomic institutions, religion, ethics, education, and art and literature.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHINGEN 101: How to Be Modern in China: A Gateway to the World Course

A gateway course on China, with a focus on the politics of everyday life, in the capital city of Beijing. Introduction to the history and politics of modern China. The pleasures, frictions, and challenges of daily living in the penumbra of power in Beijing as reported, represented, and reflected upon in fiction, film, reportage, social commentary, and scholarly writings. Priority to those preparing to participate in BOSP-Beijing Program or returning from the program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, H. (PI)

CHINGEN 118: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 135, ARCHLGY 235, CHINGEN 218)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

CHINGEN 133: Literature in 20th-Century China (CHINGEN 233)

(Graduate students register for 233.) How modern Chinese culture evolved from tradition to modernity; the century-long drive to build a modern nation state and to carry out social movements and political reforms. How the individual developed modern notions of love, affection, beauty, and moral relations with community and family. Sources include fiction and film clips. WIM course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINGEN 135: Chinese Bodies, Chinese Selves (CHINGEN 235)

Interdisciplinary. The body as a contested site of representational practices, identity politics, cultural values, and social norms. Body images, inscriptions, and practices in relation to health, morality, gender, sexuality, nationalism, consumerism, and global capitalism in China and Taiwan. Sources include anthropological, literary, and historical studies, and fiction and film. No knowledge of Chinese required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Festa, P. (PI)

CHINGEN 136: The Chinese Family (CHINGEN 236)

History and literature. Institutional, ritual, affective, and symbolic aspects. Perspectives of gender, class, and social change.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CHINGEN 141: Emergence of Chinese Civilization from Caves to Palaces (ARCHLGY 111, CHINGEN 241)

Introduces processes of cultural evolution from the Paleolithic to the Three Dynasties in China. By examining archaeological remains, ancient inscriptions, and traditional texts, four major topics will be discussed: origins of modern humans, beginnings of agriculture, development of social stratification, and emergence of states and urbanism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

CHINGEN 146: Gods, Ghosts, and Ancestors: Anthropology of Chinese Folk Religion (CHINGEN 246)

Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Festa, P. (PI)

CHINGEN 147: Searching for Immortality? Notions of Death and the Afterlife in Ancient China (CHINGEN 247)

The graves at Anyang in Henan province impressively demonstrate how important it was in ancient China, especially the Shang period (c. 1600-1045 BCE) to properly deal with the dead. Why were some people more elaborately furnished than others? What happened to people once they died? Did they become immortals like it is often assumed? Or did their souls move on to some kind of paradise? We will look at archaeological and textual evidence, critically assessing both kinds of sources to relate them in a meaningful way.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHINGEN 151: Manuscripts, Circulation of Texts, Printing (CHINGEN 251)

History of texts before the advent of printing as well as during the early period of printing, focus on Tang and Song periods. Attention to the material existence of texts, their circulation, reading habits before and after printing, the balance between orality and writing, the role of memorization, and rewriting during textual transmission. Readings in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)
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